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Manufacturing & Industrial Maintenance Self-Study Online Courses (T)

Self-study online training for industrial maintenance and manufacturing is a great way for experienced employees to add new skills. These self-study online manufacturing training classes have been designed in partnership with industry leaders to create classes that are rich in content, thorough in instruction, and directly linked to real-world competencies. Each course is easy to use, interactive, and engaging with videos, interactive scenarios, and simulators that lasts about one hour. You may purchase a 120-Day (4 months) all-access subscription for $350 per person.
 
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MANUFACTURING SELF-STUDY ONLINE COURSES (T)
 

ABRASIVES

  • Abrasives Introduction to Abrasives 101

    • Introduction to Abrasives provides a comprehensive overview of the use of a variety of abrasive products in manufacturing. Abrasive grains are made of natural or synthetic substances and used in a variety of bonded and coated products. Common grinding techniques rely on the same basic abrasive processes, but the specific kinds of abrasive products used in these processes varies. Abrasives are used in many grinding applications and other industrial processes. Anyone who works in grinding must be knowledgeable about their properties and purpose. After completing this class, users will have a greater understanding of the use of abrasives in manufacturing. This serves as the foundation for understanding more complex grinding topics in order to work with them safely and effectively.

  • Abrasives Grinding Processes 201

    • Grinding Processes provides a comprehensive overview of the various types of grinding used in modern manufacturing environments. Surface, cylindrical, centerless, and internal grinding processes are commonly used for workpieces of various shapes. Surface grinding is further distinguished by whether the table is rotary or reciprocating, and whether the spindle is vertically or horizontally oriented. Cylindrical grinding is distinguished by workholding, whether center-type or chucking-type. Centerless grinding can be either throughfeed or infeed, and internal grinding can be done on a cylindrical or centerless grinder.A foundational knowledge of the different types of grinding, including how they operate and what types of workpieces they are appropriate for, is necessary for any further learning or training in grinding. This class introduces students to the various types of grinding that they may encounter, describing both machine tools and movements.

  • Abrasives Grinding Safety 211

    • Grinding Safety provides an overview of safety concerns and precautions for grinding operations. Grinding machines, wheels, and fluids pose a number of safety hazards, so operators must take proper preventative measures. Wheel guards can protect grinding operators from flying shards in the event of wheel breakage. Personal protective equipment, such as safety glasses, provides another barrier between operators and grinding operations, as do automatic safeguards that are built into many modern machine tools. Ensuring that machines, wheels, and fluids are properly used, maintained, and tested also reduces the rate of accidents.Safety is a primary concern for any manufacturing facility. Manufacturers need to ensure that their employees are safe, that their facilities are OSHA compliant, and that they do not lose valuable productivity due to accidents. After taking this class, grinding operators will know safe grinding practices that prevent workplace injury.

  • Abrasives Basic Grinding Theory 221

    • Basic Grinding Theory provides an overview of the general process of grinding . Grinding occurs at the point of contact between an abrasive wheel and a workpiece. Like any other cutting process, grinding removes material in the form of chips. In order for a wheel to grind properly, its abrasive grains must wear and self-sharpen at a consistent rate. Otherwise, wheel problems such as loading and glazing may occur. Truing and dressing wheels and applying grinding fluids can fix or prevent these issues.An understanding of grinding wheels and processes allows operators to perform grinding operations effectively and recognize and address any grinding wheel problems that may occur. This understanding and recognition will improve the accuracy, precision, and overall success of grinding operations, reducing scrap parts and increasing productivity.

  • Abrasives Dressing and Truing 230

    • This class describes the common methods used to balance, true, and dress a standard grinding wheel.

  • Abrasives Basics of the Surface Grinder 231

    • The class Basics of the Surface Grinder provides an overview of the components, considerations, and varieties of the surface grinding machine. Surface grinders are classified by their table types and spindle orientations, and vary in levels of automation. Wheels, workholding devices, and coolant also vary based on the workpiece and grinding operation.Surface grinding is a common operation and is performed when very tight tolerances and surface finishes are required. A surface grinder operator must be familiar with the machine itself, as well as how to select and utilize wheels, workholding, and coolant, in order for the grinding operation to be successful. This foundational knowledge is necessary to reduce scrap, increase quality and production rates, and lower costs.

  • Abrasives Basics of the Cylindrical Grinder 232

    • Basics of the Cylindrical Grinder provides a comprehensive introduction to different types and components of cylindrical grinding machines. The main methods of cylindrical grinding are plunge grinding and traverse grinding. The main types of cylindrical grinders are plain, universal, automated, and limited-purpose. Grinders may also be categorized by their method of workholding and method of control. Grinding wheels, maintenance, coolant, and grinding variables vary based on the operation.Cylindrical grinding is a common operation performed to finish parts and bring them to tolerance. A cylindrical grinder operator must be familiar with the machine itself, as well as how to select and utilize wheels, workholding, and coolant, in order for the grinding operation to be successful. This foundational knowledge is necessary to reduce scrap, increase quality and production rates, and lower costs.

  • Abrasives Basics of the Centerless Grinder 233

    • Basics of the Centerless Grinder provides a comprehensive introduction to centerless grinding. Centerless grinding includes both internal and external grinding operations. During centerless grinding, a rotating regulating wheel moves a workpiece, supported by a work rest blade, along a rotating grinding wheel. This abrasive process removes a layer of material from the surface of the workpiece. Its cutting variables include wheel speed, spindle speed, surface or work speed, and feed rate. During throughfeed and endfeed grinding, workpieces move along the length of the grinding wheel, while infeed grinding pushes a shaped workpiece into the grinding wheel.Centerless grinding produces accurate parts with improved surface finish. An operator cannot use a centerless grinder without understanding how the machine functions. After this class, users should be able to describe the general machine components, controls, and basic function of a centerless grinder.

  • Abrasives Setup for the Surface Grinder 241

    • Setup for the Surface Grinder provides a comprehensive overview of the steps and considerations involved in setting up a surface grinding machine. Setup includes selecting a grinding wheel, testing and preparing the wheel, selecting the correct workholding and/or fixtures for the operation, mounting the workpiece, and setting cutting variables.Setup is integral to achieving an accurate, precise grinding operation. If any step in the setup process is not performed properly, the entire operation may be compromised, leading to a part that is out of tolerance and must be scrapped. An understanding of how to correctly and efficiently set up a surface grinding operation is necessary for increasing part quality and production rates while decreasing scrap.

  • Abrasives Setup for the Cylindrical Grinder 242

    • Setup for the Cylindrical Grinder provides a comprehensive overview of the steps and considerations involved in setting up a cylindrical grinding machine. Setting up a cylindrical grinding machine includes selecting a grinding wheel, dressing and truing the wheel, selecting the correct workholding and/or fixtures for the operation, mounting the workpiece, setting grinding variables, and ensuring workpiece alignment.Setup is integral to an accurate, precise grinding operation. If any step in the setup process is not performed properly, the entire operation may be compromised, leading to a part that is out of tolerance and must be scrapped. An understanding of how to correctly and efficiently set up a cylindrical grinding operation is necessary for increasing part quality and production rates while decreasing scrap.

  • Abrasives Setup for the Centerless Grinder 243

    • Setup for the Centerless Grinder explains how to set up a centerless grinder for typical outer diameter (OD) operations. The class explains the necessary setup for the work rest blade and regulating wheel angle of inclination, as well as the methods for selecting and mounting a grinding wheel. The class also explains the proper truing and dressing procedure for both the grinding and regulating wheel.Centerless grinding results in close tolerances but only if the machine is properly set up for the operation. After taking this class, users will be able to describe the steps required to set up a centerless grinder for routine OD grinding of a cylindrical part.

  • Abrasives Surface Grinder Operation 251

    • The class Surface Grinder Operation provides step-by-step guidelines on how to grind a rectangular workpiece. Grinding each side of a workpiece requires wheel dressing and other preparatory steps, and then roughing and finishing passes. Workpiece sides are numbered from 1 to 6 in order to track which sides must be ground perpendicular or parallel to one another. Some workpieces require special considerations, such as mounting on an angle plate or grinding at an angle.In order to perform successful surface grinding operations, operators must have a solid foundational knowledge of proper grinding methods. This class provides the practical steps and considerations for surface grinding a part from start to finish, which gives operators an understanding of grinding before ever turning on the machine. This will speed up the time it takes for new operators to learn surface grinding, and reduce user errors.

  • Abrasives Cylindrical Grinder Operation 252

    • Cylindrical Grinder Operation provides a detailed overview of the steps needed to perform the various types of operations possible on a cylindrical grinder. Operations performed on the cylindrical grinder include plunge, traverse, center-type, chucking-type, ID, profile, and taper grinding. Different steps and considerations must be taken in order to perform each type of operation, including setting the grinding variables and using the appropriate machine components and controls.In order to perform successful cylindrical grinding operations, operators must have a solid foundational knowledge of proper grinding methods. This class provides the practical steps and considerations for cylindrical grinding various workpieces from start to finish, which gives operators an understanding of grinding before ever turning on the machine.

  • Abrasives Centerless Grinder Operation 253

    • Centerless Grinder Operation explains the basic procedures required to properly operate a centerless grinder. To avoid lobing and increase workpiece roundness, a centerless grinder should have the correct workpiece rotational speed, as well as an accurately positioned work rest blade, work guides, and workpiece centerline relative to the wheel centerline.Every centerless grinder has roughly the same structure, and understanding that structure and its required procedures allows operators to grind tightly toleranced parts with accuracy, safety, and speed. After taking this class, the user should be able to describe safe and effective operation of a centerless grinder.

  • Abrasives Introduction to Grinding Fluids 261

    • Introduction to Grinding Fluids provides an overview of the uses, types, and selection considerations of grinding fluids, or coolants, used in various machining operations. Appropriate grinding fluid use depends on the type of operation, machine tool, and combination of tool and workpiece materials. The basic types of grinding fluids include various combinations of oils, water, chemicals, and additives, and are classified by their contents. The class describes each category of fluid, its optimal uses, benefits, and drawbacks, as well as ideal delivery methods, maintenance, and basic fluid safety and disposal.Selecting, using, and maintaining the appropriate grinding fluid is a key factor in the success of a grinding operation. Proper coolant application can optimize wheel performance and improve finished parts, reducing scrap and tool cost. Additionally, awareness of grinding fluid hazards and maintenance can increase workplace safety and reduce coolant costs.

  • Abrasives Abrasive Finishing Processes 271

    • Abrasive Finishing Processes provides a comprehensive overview of the various ways abrasives are used to deburr and improve the surface finish of manufactured parts. Abrasive finishing processes use bonded, coated, or loose abrasives to eliminate imperfections and smooth surface finish. Common abrasive processes used for finishing include grinding, honing, lapping, blasting, mass finishing, and more. Finishing processes are extremely important because they increase precision, improve performance, and ensure that parts meet specifications. After taking this class, users will have a better understanding of the different abrasive processes used for finishing as well as their advantages and applications. This knowledge helps prepare users to select and perform finishing processes for various applications.

  • Abrasives Grinding Variables 301

    • Grinding Variables provides a detailed overview of the different variables involved in any given grinding operation. The parameters of any grinding operation, including tolerances and surface finish, guide the variables of the operation. Variables that can affect the operation's outcome include wheel and workpiece materials, the G-Ratio, the effects of heat and grinding fluid, and the various applicable speeds and feeds.It is crucial that grinding machine operators are aware of how to adjust variables to meet specifications. Adjusting any one variable affects all others, and an incorrect variable can be the difference between a successful grinding operation and a scrapped part. Understanding grinding variables and their impact is essential to reducing manufacturing costs and increasing quality.

  • Abrasives Grinding Ferrous Metals 311

    • Grinding Ferrous Metals provides an in-depth overview of the considerations involved with grinding various ferrous metal workpiece materials. Ferrous metals’ properties vary widely. This class discusses the properties of cast irons, carbon steel, alloy steels, stainless steels, tool steels, and superalloys, and how those properties affect decisions such as abrasive wheel material, coolant usage, and grinding variables.Ferrous metals are the most commonly ground workpiece material. It is crucial for operators to be familiar not only with the properties of the metals themselves but also with how those properties affect a grinding operation. This class provides operators with knowledge of how to grind ferrous metals successfully, and what potential problems to anticipate and check for within the grinding operation.

  • Abrasives Grinding Nonferrous Materials 321

    • The class Grinding Nonferrous Materials provides an in-depth overview of the considerations for grinding nonferrous workpiece materials. Nonferrous materials vary widely in their composition and properties, and thus vary in the methods used to grind them. This class discusses the properties of nonferrous metals, including aluminum, nickel, and titanium, as well as nonmetals such as carbide, ceramics, and composites. Properties of workpiece materials affect decisions such as abrasive wheel material and grinding variables.Nonferrous materials pose unique challenges in grinding. It is crucial for operators to be familiar with the properties of the materials themselves and how those properties affect a grinding operation. This class will provide operators with the knowledge necessary to grind nonferrous workpiece materials successfully, and what potential problems to anticipate and check for within the grinding operation.

  • Abrasives Grinding Wheel Materials 331

    • Grinding Wheel Materials provides a detailed overview of the various abrasive and bond materials used in grinding wheels. The properties of the abrasive grains and bond material are important factors in any grinding operation. Abrasives vary not only in type but also in size, hardness, and friability. Bond material can vary in porosity, strength, and amount. These materials, when combined, can greatly affect material removal rates and surface finish. Grinding Wheel Materials details various abrasive and bond properties, in addition to superabrasives and ANSI nomenclature.When undertaking a grinding operation, the ability to select the correct grinding wheel is crucial to a successful outcome. The wrong grinding wheel can slow production, ruin surface finish, or otherwise fail to create a usable part. A working knowledge of grinding wheel materials will help to ensure high quality, high productivity, and low scrap rates.

  • Abrasives Dressing and Truing 341

    • Dressing and Truing provides a guide to performing necessary grinding wheel preparations. Prior to using a grinding wheel, operators must visually inspect the wheel and perform a ring test to check for cracks, and then safely mount, true, balance, and dress the wheel. Each process has specific guidelines or goals, and each step is vital to the success of a grinding operation.To perform dressing and truing properly, operators must first understand the wheel preparation process and its overall purpose. Mounting, truing, balancing, and dressing are crucial to the performance of the grinding wheel and to part quality. Improper dressing or truing can lead to poor surface finish, improper tolerances, scrapped parts, and wheel failure.

  • Abrasives Grinding Wheel Selection 351

    • Grinding Wheel Selection provides a guide on selecting the ideal grinding wheel from a grinding wheel manufacturer's catalog. Grinding wheel manufacturers list various specifications for grinding wheels, including workpiece compatibility, wheel type, wheel dimensions, abrasive material, bond material, grade, grain size, and maximum safe wheel speed. Some specifications, such as wheel type, are selected according to the grinding process. Other aspects of a grinding wheel, such as grain size and wheel structure, depend on workpiece material and the desired grinding results, including tolerance and surface finish.Selecting the most effective and economical grinding wheel requires a detailed knowledge of each aspect of the wheel and an understanding of the specifications needed to meet the requirements of a grinding operation. An incorrect or incompatible grinding wheel can lead to scrapped parts, damaged wheels or machines, and wasted time and money.

  • Abrasives Grinding Wheel Geometry 361

    • Grinding Wheel Geometry provides an overview of common grinding wheel geometries according to American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. ANSI standards provide a common language for grinding wheels, including letter designations for each part of the wheel, as well as guidelines for wheel design and usage. Most grinding wheels are one of eight basic types that are variations of straight and cup wheels. The variations come from different wheel features, such as reliefs and recesses, which make them suitable for grinding different part shapes.Selecting and using the best grinding wheel for an operation requires an understanding of wheel geometry. After taking this class, users should be able to describe common wheel geometries and the applications appropriate for each.

 

ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

  • Additive Manufacturing Introduction to Additive Manufacturing 111

    • Introduction to Additive Manufacturing provides an overview of additive manufacturing (AM), including its history, advantages, disadvantages, basic steps, methods, and materials. Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing industry that allows for rapid prototyping and the creation of more complex and functional parts, including end-use parts and traditional manufacturing tooling. AM encompasses a variety of build methods, such as material jetting and material extrusion.An understanding of the AM basics is useful for anyone working in the manufacturing industry. AM methods often streamline manufacturing processes and improve products and profitability. After completing this class, users will have gained important foundational AM knowledge, including the different AM methods and processes, the uses of AM, and the potential for future AM industrial growth.

  • Additive Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing Safety 121

    • Additive Manufacturing Safety describes the various safety hazards involved in additive manufacturing (AM) and the precautions operators should follow to protect themselves. AM methods and processes involve the use of moving and hot components, hazardous materials, and devices that produce radiation. Operators must be aware of these hazards as well as the safety protocols used to reduce them. For example, all AM materials have specific handling guidelines, including the required personal protective equipment (PPE) and ventilation for that material.Though many AM safety protocols will be familiar to anyone who has worked in a manufacturing environment, there are also hazards unique to AM. Knowing these hazards and safety precautions will help ensure that an AM operation runs smoothly, efficiently, and safely. After taking this class, users will be able to identify AM hazards, understand common safety standards, and safely operate AM equipment.

  • Additive Manufacturing The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process 131

    • The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process discusses the general steps involved in most additive manufacturing (AM) procedures. Important steps include creating 3D computer models, converting those models to AM compatible file formats, setting up and running an AM machine, and part removal and post-processing. The manufacturing industry is progressively finding AM to be an important resource in rapid prototyping and creating end-use parts. Thus, it is increasingly important that engineers and operators understand AM technology and its basic process.Understanding the basic AM process will help engineers and operators more easily learn a specific AM operation's unique considerations and procedures. A basic understanding of AM can also help assess AM's value within a manufacturing operation. After taking this class, users will understand the standard steps involved in any AM process.

  • Additive Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials 141

    • Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and materials that can be used in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing encompasses a wide range of methods and processes that are constantly evolving as manufacturers continue to make new developments. AM methods include material extrusion, directed energy deposition (DED), material jetting, binder jetting, powder bed fusion (PBF), vat photopolymerization, and sheet lamination. Different AM methods require different materials, and each method provides specific advantages and disadvantages.Understanding each AM method's basic principles, advantages, and disadvantages is essential to ensuring an AM part build's success. After completing this class, users will be able to distinguish between the different AM methods and choose the best AM method for a particular application.

  • Additive Manufacturing Design for Additive Manufacturing 201

    • Design for Additive Manufacturing (DFAM) discusses how to conceptualize and create a part design for an additive manufacturing (AM) process. DFAM provides engineers with an incredible degree of freedom. AM processes are capable of creating prototypes or parts with increased complexity, functionality, and integration. AM also allows for other unique manufacturing opportunities, such as mass customization.Though there are some design limitations with DFAM, such as part size and material choice, the process is mainly characterized by the opportunities it provides engineers. After taking this course, users will understand key DFAM concepts, such as functional complexity and hierarchical complexity, the basics of AM production processes, and how DFAM concepts related to basic AM production.

  • Additive Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing Materials Science 211

    • Additive Manufacturing Materials Science provides a comprehensive overview of the materials that can be used with additive manufacturing (AM) processes. AM materials include a variety of polymers, metals, composites, and ceramics. Each material is distinguished from another material by microstructure, mechanical and physical properties, and life cycle. Different AM processes require the use of different AM materials. Therefore, an individual must understand materials’ science to ensure proper material selection.Understanding the materials that are compatible with additive manufacturing processes is an essential part of AM process success. After completing this class, users will not only be able to distinguish between thermoplastic and thermoset polymers, ferrous metals and nonferrous alloys, and ceramic and composite materials, but users will also be able to determine which material type is most appropriate for use with a specific AM process.

  • Additive Manufacturing Integrating Additive Manufacturing with Traditional Manufacturing 221

    • Integrating Additive Manufacturing with Traditional Manufacturing discusses the factors manufacturers should consider when adding an additive manufacturing (AM) component to a traditional manufacturing operation, including cost, logistics, and best uses of AM with traditional manufacturing, among other concerns. Originally used for prototyping, AM has increasingly found more roles in traditional manufacturing processes, such as creating tooling or end-use parts. However, because the procedures and tools are so different, combining the two kinds of manufacturing requires considerable adjustments.Logistical concerns of integrating AM with traditional manufacturing include purchasing the correct machines and updating safety protocols. Design concerns involve upskilling engineers so that they can take full advantage of AM capabilities. After taking this course, users will understand how to take full advantage of AM as a tool to augment a traditional manufacturing operation.

  • Additive Manufacturing Additive Manufacturing as a Secondary Process 231

    • Additive Manufacturing as a Secondary Process provides a comprehensive overview of the way in which manufacturers can use additive manufacturing (AM) as a secondary, or indirect, process. AM methods can make a variety of tooling, such as molds and patterns, for use in several different casting, forming, and molding processes. Using AM as a secondary process benefits traditional manufacturing processes by reducing costs associated with lead time, tooling, and labor. An individual must understand the different advantages and disadvantages associated with AM as a secondary process prior to determining whether or not to utilize it.Knowledge about AM secondary processes and their benefits is important in order to understand the full impact that AM has upon traditional manufacturing. After completing this class, users will be able to identify the traditional manufacturing areas that benefit from using AM as a secondary process and the advantages and disadvantages of doing so.

  • Additive Manufacturing Nondestructive Testing for Additive Manufacturing 241

    • Nondestructive Testing for Additive Manufacturing provides an overview of the most common nondestructive testing (NDT) methods used in additive manufacturing (AM). Unlike destructive testing, NDT inspects parts without affecting their future usability. As a result, it is frequently more practical for inspecting AM parts, which are often produced in small-batch runs. However, the complex geometries, integrated features, and rough surface finishes of most AM parts can complicate NDT methods.No one NDT method can find every flaw in every AM part. Due to the variety of processes and materials, each AM method produces parts that must be inspected using different NDT methods. Manufacturers must have a proper understanding of the most appropriate NDT methods for AM part inspection to ensure they are used both effectively and reliably. After taking this class, users will be able to describe the most common NDT methods used in AM as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each.

 

ADHESIVES

  • Adhesives Intro to Adhesive Bonding 110

    • This class describes adhesive bonding, adhesive classification, and the various factors that lead to a successful adhesive bond.

  • Adhesives Basics of the Bonding Process 120

    • This class describes the basics of the adhesive bonding process, as well as the various solidification methods of adhesives.

  • Adhesives Intro to Adhesive Properties 130

    • This class describes the mechanical and nonmechanical properties of adhesives and addresses how they impact adhesive bonding.

  • Adhesives Types of Adhesives 140

    • This class describes the characteristics, pros and cons, and applications of types of synthetic adhesives.

  • Adhesives Surface Preparation 210

    • This class discusses surface factors that affect adhesion, the nature of the different types of surfaces used in adhesive bonding, and the methods of selecting and preparing a surface for adhesive bonding.

  • Adhesives Steps for Adhesive Application 220

    • This class discusses each step involved in the adhesive application process, as well as basic dispensing methods and methods of testing the effectiveness of the application process on the assembly line.

 

CNC

  • CNC Introduction to CNC Machines 201

    • Intro to CNC Machines provides a comprehensive introduction to computer numerical control (CNC), which uses numerical data to control a machine. CNC machines rely on a system of three linear and three rotational axes in order to calculate the motion and position of machine components and workpieces. A machine control unit controls and guides the movements of the machine tool. This class also describes PTP positioning, which moves to the end position before the tool begins to cut, and continuous path systems that can move a tool along two or more axes at once and cut during the movement. Additionally, closed-loop systems provide feedback, while open-loop systems do not.CNC machines are used to make a variety of products using a number of different processes. With proper training, a human operator can use CNC machines to make accurate parts with decreased risk of error. After taking this class users should be able to describe common components of CNC machine tools and controls.

  • CNC History and Definition of CNC 202

    • History and Definition of CNC provides a fundamental overview of the development of machine control, from numerical control (NC) to computer numerical control (CNC). NC machines emerged in Industry 2.0 thanks to the invention of the ballscrew and advancements in servomotors and digital tape. Technological developments in Industry 3.0 allowed machines to directly interface with computers, resulting in the first CNC machines. Continuing advancements in digital automation and data exchange are creating new applications for CNC in Industry 4.0.CNC machines are crucial to modern manufacturing and their importance is growing as technology advances. After taking this class, users will be familiar with the origins and defining characteristics of CNC systems. This knowledge will prepare users to learn more about, and ultimately work with, CNC machines.

  • CNC Basics of the CNC Lathe 211

    • Basics of the CNC Lathe explains the components and functions of both the chucker and bar machine CNC lathe varieties. CNC lathes have spindles that spin workpieces held in chucks or collets. A carriage and cross slide move along ways to position cutting tools against the spinning part. A cutting tool may remove metal from the inside or outside surface. Carbide inserts are the most common cutting tools used in turning operations. Turning centers are also capable of creating holes with the use of drills and reamers. The turret rotates to place the required tool in the cutting position.It is essential for a CNC lathe operator to be familiar with machine basics prior to executing any cutting operation. A trained operator can use a CNC lathe to create precise parts safely and consistently. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the basic functions and general machine components of a CNC lathe.

  • CNC Basics of the CNC Mill 212

    • Basics of the CNC Mill explains the components and function of CNC mills. A CNC mill produces flat or curved surfaces on square or rectangular workpieces. CNC mills may have a vertical spindle or a horizontal spindle and either their table or cutting tool may move to execute a cutting operation. CNC mills use a variety of tools, which are kept in the toolchanger on a toolholder, to perform different cutting operations. The spindle grabs the toolholder and secures it. On the worktable, vises or fixtures may secure workpieces during machining. The CNC mill can perform multiple operations in the same setup.It is essential for a CNC mill operator to be familiar with machine basics prior to executing any cutting operation. A trained operator can use a CNC mill to create precise parts safely and consistently. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the general machine components of a CNC mill and their basic function.

  • CNC Basics of the CNC Swiss-Type Lathe 215

    • Basics of the CNC Swiss-Type Lathe describes the basic functions and components of the CNC Swiss-type lathe. CNC Swiss-type lathes are a complex type of lathe with a sliding headstock that feeds bar stock through a guide bushing and toward the cutting tools. The guide bushing is the defining characteristic of the Swiss-type lathe. It provides support at the point of contact between the workpiece and the cutting tool, improving rigidity while reducing workpiece deflection and tool chatter. Additionally, CNC Swiss-type lathes are capable of holding a wide variety of cutting tools.CNC Swiss-type lathes are important pieces of equipment in modern machining due to their ability to machine complex, finished parts with minimal human intervention. After taking this class, users will understand how a CNC Swiss-type lathe differs from a conventional lathe as well as be able to describe the basic functions and general machine components of a CNC Swiss-type lathe.

  • CNC CNC Specs for the Mill 220

    • This class identifies common specifications of CNC mills and describes the various features and options available on different machines.

  • CNC Coordinates for the CNC Lathe 221

    • Coordinates for the CNC Lathe provides an overview of the coordinates used to program cutting operations on CNC lathes or turning centers. It introduces the systems of both Cartesian and polar coordinates and describes how Cartesian axes are used on a CNC lathe. The class describes both how coordinates are used on blueprints and how they are applied as machine movements. This includes concepts such as incremental vs. absolute coordinates, linear and circular interpolation, machine zero, and program zero.Coordinates and axis movements are at the core of operations for a CNC machine. A foundational knowledge of these topics is necessary to understand how and why parts can be successfully made on the CNC lathe or turning center.

  • CNC Coordinates for the CNC Mill 222

    • Coordinates for the CNC Mill provides an overview of the coordinates used to program cutting operations on CNC mills or machining centers. It introduces the systems of both Cartesian and polar coordinates and explains the Cartesian axes for vertical and horizontal CNC mills. The class describes how coordinates are used on blueprints and applied as machine movements. This includes concepts such as incremental vs. absolute coordinates, linear and circular interpolation, machine zero, and program zero.Coordinates and axis movements are at the core of operations for a CNC machine. A foundational knowledge of these topics is necessary to understand how and why parts can be successfully made on the CNC mill or machining center.

  • CNC CNC Specs for the Lathe 225

    • This class identifies common specifications of CNC lathes and describes the various features and options available on different machines.

  • CNC Basics of G Code Programming 231

    • Basics of G Code Programming provides a comprehensive introduction to G code programming. Programmers use G codes to create part programs, which direct CNC machines to create a part. Part programs consist of blocks, which contain words that are a combination of a letter address and a numerical value. N codes name or title a program block. G codes describe the operation that the machine will perform. X, Y, and Z codes determine the cutting operation location. F and S codes set the feed and speed, T codes signal the correct cutting tool, and M codes complete other miscellaneous functions.Programmers often rely on computer-assisted programming software to efficiently create part programs. However, to create or edit a part program for a CNC machine, a programmer must understand the different codes in G code programming and what they do. After taking this class, users should be able to describe how G code programming is used to create a part program.

  • CNC Introduction to CAD and CAM for Machining 241

    • Introduction to CAD and CAM for Machining provides a foundational overview of CAD and CAM systems and how they are used in CNC machining operations. While CAD greatly streamlines the process of part design, CAM ensures successful production by converting the part design into precise machine movements. This class describes CAD design methods, including the different types of part drawings and modeling, and the CAM data conversion process, including how toolpaths and movements are plotted based on design data.Without CAD and CAM, most modern CNC machining would not be possible. They are the first step in CNC part creation, and their correct execution is necessary for a successful part creation process. Understanding how CAD and CAM are used in the CNC process is an essential building block to understanding how successful cutting operations are carried out on CNC machines.

  • CNC Control Panel Functions for the CNC Lathe 251

    • Control Panel Functions for the CNC Lathe explains how operators use the machine and control panel functions to operate a CNC lathe. Operators use the handle and jog modes to move a turret or machine spindle incrementally or steadily. MDI mode executes isolated lines of programming and memory mode selects and edits existing programs. Before running a program, an operator may choose to execute the program in single block mode to prove it out or select the optional stop or block delete functions. The cycle start button starts the program. Once a program is running, the operator can use the control interface to adjust cutting variables with overrides.To use a CNC lathe, an operator needs to know how to perform important operations using machine panel functions to move machine components and control panel functions to execute programming codes. After taking this class, users should be able to explain the purpose of frequently used controls on the control panel of a CNC lathe.

  • CNC Control Panel Functions for the CNC Mill 252

    • Control Panel Functions for the CNC Mill explains how operators use the machine and control panel functions to operate a CNC mill. Operators use the handle and jog mode to move mill axes incrementally or steadily. MDI mode executes isolated lines of programming and memory mode selects and edits existing programs. Before running a program, an operator may choose to execute the program in single block mode to prove it out or select the optional stop or block delete functions. The cycle start button starts the program. Once a program is running, the operator can use the machine control unit to adjust speed and feed with an override.To use a CNC mill, an operator needs to know how to perform important operations using machine panel functions to move machine components and control panel functions to execute programming codes. After taking this class, users should be able to explain the purpose of frequently used controls on the control panel of a CNC mill.

  • CNC Offsets on the CNC Lathe 261

    • Offsets on the CNC Lathe provides explanations of the concept, purpose, and use of offsets on a CNC lathe or turning center. The workshift, geometry, and wear offsets are essential components of any part program. The class first introduces the concepts of offsets, referencing, machine zero, and program zero and then details the axis movements of and programming involved for each type of offset. Additionally, it introduces other offset features, including automatic toolset probes and tool nose radius compensation.Offsets are used in all CNC processes. Since offsets are the most foundational machine tool movements in any part program, a complete understanding of CNC operations requires an equally complete understanding of CNC offsets. After taking this class, users should be able to understand CNC lathe offsets and how to use them.

  • CNC Offsets on the CNC Mill 262

    • Offsets on the CNC Mill provides an explanation of the concept, purpose, and use of offsets on the CNC mill or machining center and details the movements and programming involved with each type of offset. The workshift, tool length, and cutter radius compensation (CRC) offsets are essential components of any part program. CNC milling may also use additional offset features, including wear offsets and semi-automatic tool compensation.Programming and operating CNC machines requires an understanding of offsets, since offsets form the foundation of all other tool movements. All CNC processes use offsets.

  • CNC Creating a Milling Program 290

    • This class explains the key components in the creation and execution of a simple milling program. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • CNC Creating a CNC Turning Program 301

    • Creating a CNC Turning Program illustrates the process of creating a part program for a CNC lathe. Part programmers use G code programming to perform the different tasks within a part program, from describing the location of a cutting tool to setting the feed and speed. Canned cycles help to shorten the length of part programs.A part programmer needs a thorough understanding of G code programming and how it relates to the axes on a CNC lathe to create a part program that produces accurate parts. After taking this class, users should be able to describe how to write a part program that machines a basic cylindrical part on the CNC lathe.

  • CNC Creating a CNC Milling Program 302

    • Creating a CNC Milling Program illustrates the process of creating a part program for a CNC mill. Writing the part program is only one step in the process of creating a part. The toolpaths created within a part program depend upon the sequence of operations necessary to machine a part. Different G code programming codes perform the different tasks within the part program, from setting speed and feed to activating rapid positioning. Canned cycles and subprograms help to short the length of part programs.All programs need to be checked by proving out. Programming and how it relates to the axes on a CNC mill are critical for a programmer to successfully create a part program that produces accurate parts. After taking this class, users should be able to describe how to write a part program that machines a basic rectangular part on the CNC mill.

  • CNC Canned Cycles 310

    • This class describes the operation of common canned cycles that appear on machining and turning centers. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • CNC Calculations for Programming the Lathe 311

    • The class Calculations for Programming the Lathe provides an in-depth explanation of various calculations necessary to determine tool positions on the lathe or turning center. Trigonometry and circle geometry are used to calculate the toolpaths used in lathe cutting operations. This class introduces the foundational toolpaths and trigonometric equations, including tool nose radius compensation. It then provides a detailed explanation of the calculations needed to determine tool positions for drilling, chamfering, and turning partial and full arcs.An understanding of trigonometry and how it can be applied on the lathe is necessary to perform any lathe operation programming. A knowledge of TNRC, drilling, and arc calculations will allow students to program most basic CNC lathe operations.

  • CNC Calculations for Programming the Mill 312

    • Calculations for Programming the Mill provides an in-depth explanation of the various calculations necessary to program toolpaths on a CNC mill or machining center for a variety of common operations. Common CNC milling operations covered in this class are face milling, pocket milling, milling full and partial arcs, and holemaking. Important concepts for programming these toolpaths include step-over, approach distance, trigonometry, and boxing routines, as well as some of G codes.Calculations for Programming the Mill details the calculations necessary to program a CNC mill. After taking this class, users will be able to understand and perform most basic CNC mill operations.

  • CNC Canned Cycles for the Lathe 321

    • Canned Cycles for the Lathe provides an overview of standard canned cycles used on CNC lathes. A canned cycle is a repeatable section of a part program that acts as a programming shortcut for common cutting operations. Canned cycles reduce errors and decrease programming time. CNC controls typically offer standard canned cycles, manufacturer cycles, and customized cycles. CNC lathe and turning center canned cycles include holemaking cycles, simple turning and facing cycles, and the more complex multiple repetitive cycles.Canned cycles are used in a vast majority of part programs. To create, edit, or monitor part programs, programmers and operators must know how canned cycles work and how to program them. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the standard canned cycles available on common CNC lathes and turning centers.

  • CNC Canned Cycles for the Mill 322

    • Canned Cycles for the Mill provides an overview of the standard canned cycles used on CNC mills. A canned cycle is a repeatable block in a part program that acts as a programming shortcut for common cutting operations. CNC controls typically offer standard canned cycles, manufacturer cycles, and customized cycles. Most CNC mills offer holemaking canned cycles and some also offer milling-specific canned cycles, such as rough facing or pocket milling cycles.Canned cycles are used in a vast majority of part programs. To create, edit, or monitor part programs, part programmers and operators must know how canned cycles work and how to program them. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the standard canned cycles available on common CNC mills and machining centers.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Mill: Control Panel Overview 250

    • This class describes the various sections of the Fanuc 0-C mill control panel as well as the steps for powering up, powering down, and homing the machine. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Lathe: Control Panel Overview 255

    • This class describes the various sections of the Fanuc 0-C lathe control panel as well as the steps for powering up, powering down, and homing the machine. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Mill: Entering Offsets 260

    • This class provides step-by-step instructions for adjusting offsets on the Fanuc 0-C mill control during a production run. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Lathe: Entering Offsets 265

    • This class provides step-by-step instructions for adjusting offsets on the Fanuc 0-C lathe control during a production run. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Mill: Locating Program Zero 270

    • This class describes how to determine work offsets and tool geometry offsets on the Fanuc 0-C mill control during setup. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Lathe: Locating Program Zero 275

    • This class describes how to determine work offsets and tool geometry offsets on the Fanuc 0-C lathe control during setup. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Mill: Program Execution 280

    • This class describes the steps necessary to activate, execute, and restart programs using the Fanuc O-C control for the mill. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Lathe: Program Execution 285

    • This class describes the steps necessary to activate, execute, and restart programs using the Fanuc O-C control for the lathe. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Mill: Program Storage 310

    • This class describes common methods for transferring and storing part programs on the Fanuc 0-C control for the mill. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Lathe: Program Storage 315

    • This class describes common methods for transferring and storing part programs on the Fanuc 0-C lathe control. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Mill: First Part Runs 320

    • This class describes how to verify the accuracy of a program and make minor editing changes on the Fanuc 0-C mill control. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Fanuc Fanuc Lathe: First Part Runs 325

    • This class describes how to verify the accuracy of a program and make minor editing changes on the Fanuc 0-C lathe control. Includes Fanuc CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas NGC: Next Generation Control Panel Overview 101

    • Next Generation Control Panel Overview describes the latest control panel from Haas Automation®, Inc. The class identifies the different areas of the control keypad and describes the function of each individual key. Display keys change what information appears on the display screen. Operators use cursor keys to navigate windows, menus, and tables on screen. Mode keys change the operational state of the CNC machine. Operators enter numbers, letters, and special characters using alpha and numeric keys. Override keys temporarily alter feed, speed, and other variables while a part program runs. Jog keys manually control axis motions. Function keys perform a variety of tasks, depending on the mode and display.Gaining a comprehensive understanding of the control panel's different functions will prepare users to successfully perform operations, utilizing the full capabilities of the Next Generation Control.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Next Generation and Classic Controls 111

    • Haas Next Generation and Classic Controls compares the two versions of control panels from Haas Automation®, Inc. While the two control panels look and function similarly, some key differences separate the Next Generation Control (NGC) and Classic Haas Control (CHC). Operators switching between using CHC and NGC machines must adjust to differences in hardware and software as well as changes to the control keypad and display screen. Additionally, the NGC uses updated cybersecurity features with which operators must familiarize themselves.In order to successfully navigate the operational nuances of the CHC and NGC, it is vital for operators to develop a comprehensive understanding of the differences between the two control panels. After taking this class, users will be able to distinguish between many of the distinct features of the CHC and NGC.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas NGC: Entering Mill Offsets 201

    • Haas NGC: Entering Mill Offsets 201 covers the basics of offsets used on Haas Automation®, Inc.'s Next Generation Control (NGC) mill. Offsets on the NGC mill include work offsets, tool length offsets, tool wear offsets, diameter geometry offsets, and coolant position offsets. The class describes how to access and navigate the offsets menus on the NGC control panel. Additionally, the class explains how milling operators determine and enter offset values both manually and using the Part Zero Set and Tool Offset Measure functions available on the NGC.In order to machine parts successfully, NGC mill operators should understand the concepts of work, tool length, diameter geometry, tool wear, and coolant position offsets and possess basic skills to enter and adjust these offsets before and during a milling operation. The correct application of offsets allows milling operators to avoid machine and workpiece damage, minimize tool wear, and produce parts with the proper tolerance.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas NGC: Entering Lathe Offsets 202

    • Haas NGC: Entering Lathe Offsets 202 addresses concepts and processes for entering offsets on the Haas Next Generation Control (NGC) lathe. Offsets on the NGC lathe include work offsets and a range of tool geometry offsets. Tool geometry offsets for the Haas NGC lathe include tool length, radius, tip direction, and wear offsets. This course describes each individual offset and explains how to navigate the offsets menu and enter offset values into the NGC panel.Performing turning operations on the NGC lathe requires a conceptual understanding of lathe offsets and the ability to enter tool and work offsets using the appropriate steps. Correctly determining and entering tool and work offsets allows operators to improve efficiency by producing more parts within tolerance, minimizing machining errors, and reducing loss due to scrapped or reworked parts.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas NGC: Locating Program Zero on the Mill 211

    • Haas NGC: Locating Part Zero on the Mill describes important considerations for selecting and setting part zero on the Haas Next Generation Control (NGC) mill. Part zero is the origin, or starting point, of a CNC part program and must be accurate in order to successfully perform a machining operation. Machinists use a variety of tools and strategies to locate part zero. Tools and devices used to locate part zero include edge finders, dial test indicators, 3D sensors, and probing systems.After taking this course, machinists will understand effective methods for selecting and setting part zero on various parts and part features. Utilizing best practices for selecting and setting part zero improves machining efficiency and reduces nonproductive time during part setup processes.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas NGC: Locating Program Zero on the Lathe 212

    • Haas NGC: Locating Program Zero on the Lathe describes important concepts related to program zero, or part zero, on the Haas Next Generation Control (NGC) lathe. Part zero is the starting point for all machine operations on the lathe. It is most often located at the center of the finished part face. Lathe operators must determine the most effective approach to locating part zero for each workpiece and operations. Methods for locating part zero vary based on the operator’s approach to setting tool length offsets.After taking this course, operators will be able to distinguish between the different methods for locating part zero and the different factors that determine which approach is best. Operators will also understand the appropriate steps for locating part zero on the Haas NGC lathe with each method. This knowledge will allow them to operate lathes effectively and efficiently.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Mill: Classic Control Panel Overview 250

    • This class describes the various sections of the Haas mill control panel as well as the steps for powering up, powering down, and homing the machine. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Lathe Classic Control Panel Overview 256

    • Haas Lathe Classic Control Panel Overview describes the Classic Haas Control (CHC) lathe panel from Haas Automation®, Inc. The class identifies the different areas of the control keypad and describes the function of each individual key. The Classic Haas Control (CHC) lathe control panel has three distinct regions. Manual controls of the Haas lathe, such as the HANDLE, EMERGENCY STOP, and FEED HOLD key, function much like the manual controls of other machines. The display screen shows all relevant information needed during the machining process. The control keypad allows the operator to enter a variety of machine commands. After taking this class, users will have a comprehensive understanding of the control panel's different functions and be able to successfully perform basic operations , including powering up and powering down, checking and activating coolant, sending the turret to machine zero, activating the chip conveyor, and leaving messages.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Mill Classic Controls: Entering Offsets 260

    • This class provides step-by-step instructions for adjusting offsets on the Haas mill during a production run. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Lathe Classic Controls: Entering Offsets 265

    • This class provides step-by-step instructions for adjusting offsets on the Haas lathe during a production run. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Mill Classic Controls: Locating Program Zero 270

    • This class describes how to determine work offsets and tool geometry offsets on the Haas mill during setup. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Lathe: Locating Program Zero 275

    • This class describes how to determine work offsets and tool geometry offsets on the Haas lathe during setup. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Mill: Program Execution 280

    • This class describes the steps necessary to activate, execute, and restart programs on the Haas mill. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Lathe: Program Execution 285

    • This class describes the steps necessary to activate, execute, and restart programs on the Haas lathe. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Mill: Program Storage 310

    • This class describes common methods for transferring and storing part programs on the Haas mill. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Lathe: Program Storage 315

    • This class describes common methods for transferring and storing part programs on the Haas lathe. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Mill: First Part Runs 320

    • This class describes how to verify the accuracy of a program and make minor editing changes on the Haas mill. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Haas Haas Lathe: First Part Runs 325

    • This class describes how to verify the accuracy of a program and make minor editing changes on the Haas lathe. Includes Haas CNC Simulators.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: Control Panel Overview 250

    • This class introduces the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix mill control panel and describes the steps for powering up and powering down the machine.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: Control Panel Overview 255

    • This class introduces the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix lathe control panel and describes the steps for powering up and powering down the machine.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: Safety for the Mill 260

    • This class discusses common safety issues concerning the Mazak mill, as well as OSHA and ANSI requirements for Mazak mill operators.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: Safety for the Lathe 265

    • This class discusses common safety issues concerning the Mazak lathe, as well as OSHA and ANSI requirements for Mazak lathe operators.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: Locating Program Zero 270

    • This class discusses the various coordinates systems involving machine components and the considerations for selecting workpiece zero.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: Locating Program Zero 275

    • This class discusses the various coordinate systems involving machine components and the considerations for selecting workpiece zero.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: Entering Offsets 280

    • This class provides an overview of offsets and the step-by-step instructions needed for measuring, entering, and adjusting offsets using the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix Mill control.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: Entering Offsets 285

    • This class will teach you various offsets of the Matrix lathe, how to view offsets using the Matrix control, and how to adjust offsets to compensate for tool wear.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Creating an EIA/ISO Program for the Mazak Mill 286

    • This class explains the key components in the creation and execution of a simple milling program.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Creating an EIA/ISO Program for the Mazak Lathe 287

    • This class explains the key components in the creation and execution of a simple turning program.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Creating a Mazatrol Program for the Mill 288

    • This class covers the basics of creating a simple milling program on the Mazatrol Matrix Mill control. Topics include the basic units that comprise a Mazatrol program and the range of machining units available to make almost any milled part.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Creating a Mazatrol Program for the Lathe 289

    • This class covers the basics of creating a simple turning program on the Mazatrol Smart lathe control. Topics include the basic units that comprise a Mazatrol program and the range of turning units available to make almost any turned part.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: Program Execution 290

    • This class addresses the steps needed to start, stop, and restart programs on the Mazak mill, along with the steps used to activate a program.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: Program Execution 295

    • This class addresses the steps needed to start, stop, and restart programs on the Mazak lathe, along with the steps used to activate a program.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: Program Storage 310

    • This class describes common methods for transferring and storing part programs on the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix mill control.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: Program Storage 315

    • This class describes common methods for transferring and storing part programs on the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix lathe control.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Mill: First Part Runs 320

    • This class describes how to verify the accuracy of a program and make minor editing changes on the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix Mill control to ensure part quality.

  • CNC Controls: Mazak Mazak Lathe: First Part Runs 325

    • This class describes how to verify the accuracy of a program and make minor editing changes on the Mazak Mazatrol Matrix Lathe control to ensure part quality.

 

COATINGS

  • Coatings Intro to Coating Composition 110

    • This class discusses key components of a coating, as well as the environmental risks solvents pose and alternatives to using solvent as a carrier for coatings.

  • Coatings Surface Preparation for Coatings 120

    • This class covers various options for preparing surfaces before the application of a coating. The class also addresses the nature of common surfaces.

  • Coatings Processes for Applying Coatings 140

    • This class covers the processes used to apply coatings to a variety of surfaces. This class includes descriptions of manual coating, automated coating, electroplating, and powder coating.

  • Coatings Coating Defects 150

    • This class covers the common types of coating defects, as well as their related causes and prevention techniques.

  • Coatings Troubleshooting Coating Defects 170

    • This class covers the basics of troubleshooting coating processes. It includes descriptions of various tools used in the troubleshooting process, including Pareto charts, check sheets, and fishbone diagrams.

 

COMPOSITES

  • Composites Safety for Composite Processing 115

    • This class teaches operators how to protect themselves from illness and injury when working with composites. You will also learn how to store and discard hazardous materials. Finally, you will learn about the agencies that develop and regulate workplace safety standards.

  • Composites Overview of Composite Processes 120

    • This class covers the basic methods for processing composites, as well as some of the materials used for these processes.

  • Composites Traditional Composites 125

    • This class covers the materials commonly used to create resins and reinforcements for traditional composites. It also describes the basic characteristics of polymers.

  • Composites Advanced Thermoset Resins for Composites 130

    • This class covers the thermoset resins commonly used to create advanced composite parts, as well as their properties and general considerations for material selection.

  • Composites Advanced Materials for Composites 135

    • This class covers the thermoplastic and non-polymeric resins used to create advanced composite parts, as well as the materials used to create high-performance fiber reinforcements.

  • Composites Intro to Lay-up and Spray-up Molding 140

    • This class covers lay-up and spray-up molding of traditional fiberglass composites.

  • Composites Intro to Compression Molding 170

    • This class will teach you about the compression molding process, as well as the materials and equipment associated with it.

  • Composites Surface Finishing Composites 190

    • Understanding how to finish the surface of a composite part helps an operator create parts that meet the demands of the customer. This class will teach you about surface finishing operations for composite parts.

  • Composites Vacuum Bagging Technique: Single-sided Bagging 230

    • This class covers basic procedures for performing single-sided vacuum bagging. It also covers general safety precautions and strategies for preventing common problems.

  • Composites Composite Inspection and Defect Prevention 240

    • This class describes common methods for inspecting composites and preventing defects.

  • Composites Repair Methods for Composites 250

    • This class covers basic procedures and best practices for repairing composites, as well as the structure of composite laminates and sandwich panels.

 

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

  • Electrical Systems Electrical Units 101

    • Electrical Units provides a foundational overview of electricity, including fundamental measures and terminology used to discuss electricity. Electricity is the flow of electrons, which are negatively charged particles. The amount of valence electrons in an atom determines how well it allows electricity to flow. There are two types of electricity, alternating current and direct current, but both flow from negative to positive. Current is measured by certain terms, including amperage, voltage, resistance, and wattage. Ohm’s Law and Watt’s Law describe the relationships between these values in a circuit.When working with electrical systems, knowing how electricity flows and what different terms mean is very important. After taking this class, users should be familiar with the fundamentals of electricity and the vocabulary used to describe it. This enables users to build an understanding of more advanced electrical concepts and discuss them with the correct terminology.

  • Electrical Systems Safety for Electrical Work 111

    • Safety for Electrical Work provides an overview of the risks of working with electricity, as well as safety precautions Electricity can cause shock, burns, and fires. Electric shock occurs when current passes through a person's body. Overheating electrical components can cause burns and fires. To prevent electrical injuries, circuits and components must be properly grounded and maintained and employees must observe lockout/tagout practices and wear the appropriate personal protective equipment.Employees must understand and practice precautionary and preventative measures in order to safely and effectively work with electricity. After completing this course, users will be able to describe the best practices for maintaining safety and preventing injury while working with electrical systems.

  • Electrical Systems Introduction to Circuits 201

    • Introduction to Circuits provides a foundational overview of electrical circuitry. Whether wired in series, parallel, or a combination of the two, all circuits consist of a source, path, control, and load. Each of these components serves a purpose, and many circuits have extra components to prevent safety hazards and damage. Visual representations of circuits, such as schematic diagrams, use symbols of these components to illustrate the circuit’s layout. This method makes it easier to understand circuits and the rules that describe how they function, such as Kirchhoff’s Laws.Understanding how circuits work is essential when working with electricity. This includes being familiar with circuit components, circuit diagrams, and the rules that govern circuits, which serves as the basis for understanding advanced electrical topics. Without the foundational information presented in this class, users would not be prepared to study more complex aspects of electrical systems.

  • Electrical Systems Introduction to Magnetism 211

    • Introduction to Magnetism provides a thorough overview of magnetism and how it relates to electricity. Magnetism is a force of attraction and repulsion that occurs when the molecules in a material align. Materials become magnetized when they are exposed to a magnetic field. Materials can be demagnetized with heat, vibration, or a magnetic field generated by alternating current. Magnets have two different poles, like the earth. Magnetic forces exit the north pole of a magnet and are attracted to the south pole. These forces, or lines of flux, are essential for producing electricity with magnetic induction.Electricity and magnetism are closely related. Magnetism is used to create electricity, and electricity is used to create magnetism. Most of the world’s electricity comes from magnetic induction. Understanding how these and other magnetic devices work requires familiarity with magnetism and its relationship to electricity.

  • Electrical Systems DC Circuit Components 221

    • DC Circuit Components provides a comprehensive overview of the different parts that appear in DC circuits, including source, path, control, and load. DC power sources include batteries, generators, and piezoelectricity. The path of a circuit is made of a conductor, which has low resistance, but other materials with more resistance, such as insulators, semiconductors, and resistors, are often also used in circuits. In general, switches are used to control current, but many circuits also have safety devices, such as fuses and breakers, to protect the circuit from high current conditions.Understanding the purpose of different components is essential for working with DC circuits. After taking this class, users should have a firm grasp of many different circuit components and understand when and why they are used. This knowledge will allow them to design effective circuits and recognize potential problems with a circuit’s components.

  • Electrical Systems NEC(R) Overview 231

    • NEC Overview provides information on the contents, purpose, history, and applications of the National Electrical Code. The NEC is written for experienced electrical workers. The NEC(R) is the essential standard on minimum safe installations. While safe practices are encouraged when working with electrical systems and the NEC(R) offers them, the code is not the law unless it is adopted by local government. However, the NEC(R), in some form, is the law for minimum electrical installations in all states. Using and understanding the National Electrical Code is essential for anyone who works with electrical systems. This course assists readers in navigating the NEC(R) and understanding its function. After completing this course, users will be able to describe the structure of the National Electric Code(R), as well as its major guidelines that impact electrical maintenance in production facilities.

  • Electrical Systems AC Fundamentals 241

    • AC Fundamentals 241 discusses alternating current (AC) as the most common form of electrical power. AC waves can be viewed and measured on the screen of an oscilloscope. Alternating current is economical, can be sent long distances, and can be stepped up or stepped down to adjust voltage. Different AC waveforms exist, the most common being sine waves. Ohm's law holds true for AC circuits, but voltage and current both increase and decrease together in a cycle while impedance remains constant.Anyone working within electrical systems must understand the fundamental concepts and basic workings of alternating current to ensure their safety. After taking this course, students will be able to describe electrical flow in an alternating current circuit and the impact alternating current has on electrical variables.

  • Electrical Systems Electrical Instruments 251

    • Electrical Instruments 251 describes the various roles of electrical testing instruments in maintaining the safety of electrical workers. From the basic galvanometer to today’s digital multimeters, electrical instruments are primarily used to determine if electricity is flowing properly and safely through devices and circuits. Most meters made today are digital. Watt and watt-hour meters are used to measure power or energy. Many other meters, such as oscilloscopes, decibel meters, and wiggies, are designed for specialized uses.All electrical instruments offer a better understanding of the operating conditions of electricity. Various organizations that set manufacturer standards ensure the accuracy of electrical instruments. Upon taking this course, students will be able to describe how to use electrical measuring instruments to safely and accurately measure electrical variables.

  • Electrical Systems Electrical Print Reading 261

    • Electrical Print Reading provides a fundamental overview of common electrical prints and symbols. The most common prints are pictorial, one-line, schematic, and wiring diagrams. Pictorial diagrams use illustrations to represent circuit components, but the other common types of diagrams use symbols. There are many different symbols, and some symbols have different variations. Diagrams include symbol keys to indicate what symbols represent, and sometimes symbols are labeled to make them easier to understand.This class introduces users to the types of prints and symbols that they are most likely to see, which will prepare them for reading and writing their own electrical prints. These are integral skills for working with electrical systems, since almost all electrical projects, from designing a circuit to troubleshooting one, involve electrical prints.

  • Electrical Systems DC Power Sources 271

    • DC Power Sources provides a foundational overview of direct current and the different power sources that produce it. A DC power source is any means used to convert various forms of energy into DC electricity. DC power sources include batteries, fuel cells, solar cells, and DC generators. Most DC power is supplied by batteries, but generators are used for some applications. Fuel cells and solar cells are not widely used but may be more popular in the future if they can be made less expensive and more efficient.After taking this class, users will be familiar with different methods of producing DC power and other important concepts, such as magnetic induction. This is important for working with electrical systems because many electrical devices operate on direct current. In addition, DC may become more popular in the future if alternative sources such as fuel and solar cells become more cost-effective.

  • Electrical Systems AC Power Sources 281

    • AC Power Sources describes the common power sources used to generate alternating current (AC). Most AC power is produced by rotating field generators. Rotating field generators are made up of a rotor, stator, windings, and poles and rely on magnetic induction to produce voltage. Several types of distribution systems link AC generators to end users in order to deliver power. Transformers step voltage up and down to make it easier to transfer within a distribution system. Most transformers are three-phase and can have different types of cores. Regardless of its application, electricity in all forms must always be handled with care to minimize safety risks and damage to equipment.After completing this course, users will be able to describe common AC power sources, their basic constructions, and the ways in which they operate. This knowledge will enable users to keep themselves safe while effectively working within electrical systems that use common AC power sources.

  • Electrical Systems Conductor Selection 291

    • Conductor Selection 291 describes the different features of conductors and the considerations involved selecting conductors for electrical wiring applications. Electricians use the National Electrical Code(R) to guide the selection process. Different materials are used to construct conductors. Copper is the most popular choice due to its affordability, low resistance, and good conductivity. Insulation is used to protect conductors from damage and electricians from injury. Wire protection is added to conductors to prevent damage from environmental factors.Correction factors must be considered when selecting a conductor, including ambient temperature, number of conductors, and conductor length. When electricians use the NEC(R) and have an understanding of conductor features and correction factors, selecting appropriate conductors to safely carry power is ensured and essential when working with electrical systems.

  • Electrical Systems Series Circuit Calculations 301

    • Series Circuit Calculations provides a comprehensive overview of the rules and formulas used to calculate and predict electrical quantities and capacity. Using a direct current (DC) series circuit as an example, it explains basic rules of electricity and how different electrical values relate.After taking this class, users should have a firm grasp of the methods used to determine various electrical values in a circuit. Understanding circuit rules and calculations is important for working with all aspects of electrical systems. These formulas and laws make it possible to predict electrical quantities, which is necessary when selecting components for a circuit. They are also helpful tools for designing and troubleshooting circuits.

  • Electrical Systems Parallel Circuit Calculations 311

    • Parallel Circuit Calculations provides a comprehensive overview of the rules and formulas used to calculate electrical quantities and capacity. Using a direct current parallel circuit as an example, it explains the basic rules for electrical variables and how they relate. In a parallel circuit, voltage is the same across each branch. Current in a parallel circuit adds up to the total current value. In any one branch of a parallel circuit, current and resistance are inversely proportional. The total resistance is always less than the smallest individual resistance.After taking this class, users should have a strong understanding of the methods used to determine electrical values in parallel and combination circuits. Understanding these rules and formulas is important for working with electrical systems because they make it possible to predict and calculate electrical quantities. This is especially important for parallel circuits because they are so commonly used.

  • Electrical Systems Battery Selection 321

    • Battery Selection discusses the factors by which batteries are rated and other considerations that go into selecting an appropriate battery. It also describes many of the most common types of batteries. To choose an appropriate battery, check the amp-hour, reserve capacity, and cranking amperage ratings. Also consider rechargeability, life span, size, weight, environment, and total cost.Understanding the factors that go into selecting a battery is important because so many devices rely on batteries for power. If the wrong battery is chosen for an application, it may not be strong enough or be able to operate for the required length of time. In some cases, using the wrong battery can even lead to safety hazards. However, choosing appropriate batteries for different applications ensures that devices will work optimally and prevents unnecessary costs.

 

FASTENERS

  • Fasteners Introduction to Assembly 101

    • The class Introduction to Assembly provides an overview of the processes and methods used to assemble components into finished parts. Assembly is often performed on assembly lines, which may be manual, automated, or a combination of both. The three main assembly methods are mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, and welding. Mechanical fastening uses fasteners to join components. Fasteners can join dissimilar materials, are inexpensive, and allow for disassembly. Adhesive bonding uses materials such as gels, liquids, or tapes to form a joint. Welding uses pressure, heat, or a combination of energy sources to create a very strong, permanent joint. These methods are sometimes used together.The information presented in this class serves as a foundation for users to learn more about, and eventually perform, fastening and assembly. Understanding the differences between different assembly methods prepares users to learn about the more detailed and complex aspects of each method.

  • Fasteners Intro to Fastener Ergonomics 130

    • This class introduces ergonomics and discusses the ergonomic concerns associated with assembly.

  • Fasteners Properties for Fasteners 200

    • This class describes the key properties of steel fasteners as well as common fastener failures that may occur.

  • Fasteners Understanding Torque 210

    • This class explains the importance of torque as well as how torque is derived and applied to bolted joints. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Fasteners Safety for Assembly 211

    • The class Safety for Assembly provides a comprehensive overview of different safety precautions for assembly. Assemblers must wear proper clothing and protective equipment, which varies for different tasks. A safe assembly site is organized and clean, with clear paths around workstations. Working in assembly requires an awareness of electrical, forklift, and point of operation safety precautions, as well as proper fall prevention and tool handling procedures. Applying ergonomics to assembly helps prevent injury caused by repetition, poor posture, and excessive force.Before beginning any assembly work, assemblers must know the appropriate safety precautions and be trained to use required protective equipment. This can be challenging because there are different precautions for different tasks. After taking this class, users will be familiar with the basic safety guidelines for assembly, which will prepare them to perform various assembly operations safely and effectively.

  • Fasteners Introduction to Fastener Threads 221

    • Introduction to Fastener Threads provides a comprehensive overview of threads and thread standards used with fasteners. Fasteners use threads to hold components together or grip material. Threads may be external, like those on screws and bolts, or internal, like those in nuts. All threads have crests, roots, and flanks, but these may vary in shape and size. The two main thread standards are Unified and ISO metric. Unified threads are measured in inches and metric threads are measured in millimeters. Threaded fasteners are the most popular type of fasteners in assembly. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the parts of a thread, distinguish between different types of threads, and understand thread specifications. This knowledge will prepare users to work with threaded fasteners and select appropriate fasteners for different applications.

  • Fasteners Overview of Threaded Fasteners 231

    • Overview of Threaded Fasteners summarizes the most common types of threaded fasteners and how they are used to join parts. Bolts and screws are both externally threaded fasteners. Bolts generally fit through unthreaded holes, while screws fit into threaded holes. Nuts are internally threaded fasteners used to tighten bolts. Washers are not threaded fasteners, but they are often used with screws and bolts. Certain nuts and washers provide extra locking action to ensure that joints stay tight. Threaded fasteners are the most commonly used fasteners. After taking this class, users will be able to identify many different types of threaded fasteners and describe how and when to use them. This familiarity serves as the foundation for learning how to properly select and assemble threaded fasteners, which leads to time and cost savings and prevents fastener failure.

  • Fasteners Tools for Threaded Fasteners 235

    • The class Tools for Threaded Fasteners provides a comprehensive overview of the different tools that are used to assemble threaded fasteners. There are many different types of tools used with threaded fasteners, but they all operate by applying torque. Manually powered hand tools include wrenches and screwdrivers. Power tools include battery-operated tools, electric tools, and pneumatic tools. Many power tools use clutches to control operation. These may be continuous-drive tools or discontinuous-drive tools.Threaded fasteners are the most commonly used fasteners in assembly, and assemblers must be familiar with the different tools they require. After taking this class, users will have foundational knowledge of the different types of tools used with threaded fasteners and their advantages and disadvantages. Users will also be able to identify some of the factors that go into selecting a tool for a threaded fastener application.

  • Fasteners Overview of Non-Threaded Fasteners 241

    • The class Overview of Non-Threaded Fasteners summarizes the most common types of non-threaded fasteners and how they are used to join parts. Common non-threaded fasteners include pins, keys, retaining rings, and rivets. Pins are inserted in holes to hold parts together. Keys fit into recesses in shafts and components to secure them together. Rings fit inside holes or over shafts to position components. Rivets are inserted into holes and then deformed to permanently fasten components.Non-threaded fasteners are used for many applications in manufacturing. After taking this class, users will be able to describe several different types of non-threaded fasteners, what they are used for, and how they are installed. Users who work with non-threaded fasteners must be familiar with these concepts so that they can use them safely and effectively.

  • Fasteners Threaded Fastener Selection 255

    • Threaded Fastener Selection describes how to successfully identify and choose threaded fasteners, as well as nuts and washers, for various assembly applications. There are many types of fasteners, so appropriate selection is important to ensure proper assembly. Fastener selection requires the consideration of various fastener characteristics including head style, driving recess, point style, size, material, strength grades, and identification markings. After taking this class, users will be able to identify threaded fasteners, their basic characteristics, and their identification markings, for safe and secure assembly.

 

HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Introduction to Fluid Systems 101

    • Introduction to Fluid Systems provides a comprehensive overview of fluid power transmission and fluid power systems. Fluid systems use pressurized fluid to transmit energy. Hydraulic systems use liquids and pneumatic systems use gases. All fluid systems rely on the same basic components for power transmission, but the specific kinds each type of system uses varies. Fluid systems are used in many industrial applications. Anyone who works with fluid systems must be knowledgeable about their purpose and components. After completing this class, users will have a greater understanding of fluid power systems. This serves as the foundation for understanding more complex fluid power topics in order to work with them safely and effectively.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics The Forces of Fluid Power 201

    • The Forces of Fluid Power presents a comprehensive overview of fluid power transmission systems. It offers a broad scope of information, from fluid characteristics and basic energy forms to force multiplication and the effect of fluid flow rate in a system. When pressurized, fluids are able to produce tremendous power with a minimal amount of effort. Maintaining constant fluid flow is essential for any system to work effectively. While the type of fluid in systems differ, the key components of all fluid systems and processes are similar. More importantly, the units of measurement are the same.Without a full understanding of fluid power and the units used to measure key components of a fluid system, a fluid system may not have the proper pressure, volume, force, or fluid flow rate needed to maintain constant fluid flow. After taking the class, users will be able to better recognize how fluids systems function and explain the variables that affect them.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Safety for Hydraulics and Pneumatics 211

    • "Safety for Hydraulics and Pneumatics" provides a complete overview of the best safety and injury prevention practices for fluid power systems. Fluid power systems rely on the use of highly pressurized liquids and gases. As a result, working with fluid power systems is associated with a variety of hazards, including risk of injection injuries as well as exposure to extreme temperatures and hazardous energy. Several devices and safety procedures can mitigate the potential for accidents and damage to system components.Without a thorough understanding of fluid system safety standards, procedures, and devices, working with pressurized fluids can result in severe burns, poisoning, respiratory damage, intestinal bleeding, and death. After taking "Safety for Hydraulics and Pneumatics, " users will be able recognize how to prevent accidental injury and equipment damage when working with fluid power systems.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Introduction to Hydraulic Components 221

    • Introduction to Hydraulic Components provides users with an overview of how the active and passive components of a hydraulic system work together to transmit power. The active components of a hydraulic system are the hydraulic pump, control valves, and the actuator. Fluid conductors and fluid storage containers are passive components. Each part of a hydraulic system contributes to the manipulation of pressurized hydraulic fluid in order for the system to perform work.After completing Introduction to Hydraulic Components, users will have an understanding of how the main components of a hydraulic system work together to convert hydraulic energy into mechanical power. Fluid system operators should be knowledgeable about the functions of hydraulic system components and how each part contributes to the success of the hydraulic system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Introduction to Pneumatic Components 231

    • Introduction to Pneumatic Components provides a comprehensive overview of pneumatic power and the elements that allow a pneumatic system to perform work. Users will become familiar with the physical laws behind the compression of the pneumatic fluids that power a system and they will gain an understanding of how each unique component impacts the efficiency and effectiveness of the system. Transportation, manufacturing, and construction are just some of the fields that depend on pneumatic systems to perform work. Modern cranes, excavators, and automobile brakes would not be possible without pneumatics. In manufacturing, pneumatic technology is widely used for factory automation, with applications in all steps of product manipulation and processing. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the components that affect each step of a pneumatic system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Introduction to Fluid Conductors 241

    • Introduction to Fluid Conductors provides a comprehensive overview of conductors in a fluid system, outlining the potential impact that each conductor has on a specific system. The unique types of conductors have a profound influence on the effectiveness of a fluid system. In general, every conductor offers a tradeoff between flexibility and strength. A fluid conductor must be matched according to the specific needs of a particular system. Without proper fluid conductor selection, leakage and a lack of system inefficiency may occur. Inefficiency will slow production and add excess waste and cost to the process. After taking this class, users will be able to better identify the types of fluid conductors and their specific advantages and disadvantages within a fluid system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Fittings for Fluid Systems 251

    • Fittings for Fluid Systems provides a comprehensive overview of the types of fittings used to join or terminate a conductor run, as well as an overview of the maintenance and instillation of fittings. The unique types of fittings have a profound impact on the effectiveness of a pneumatic system. In general, every type of fittings offers something specific in terms of its ability to move, direct, and seal a system. A fitting must be matched to the needs of the size, conductor type and fluid type in use. Without proper fitting selection and maintenance, the pneumatic system will lose efficiency or fail. Loss of efficiency and system failure adds excess waste and cost to the process. After taking this class, users will be able to better identify the types of fittings used in a pneumatic system and how proper selection of a fitting will provide optimal efficiency within a system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Preventive Maintenance for Fluid Systems 261

    • Preventive Maintenance for Fluid Systems provides an overview of the benefits of a preventive maintenance program for fluid systems. Contamination in hydraulic or pneumatic fluid is the most common cause of malfunction for hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Preventive maintenance involves using filters or strainers to prevent contamination in the hydraulic fluid. A preventive maintenance program requires system operators to follow routine maintenance schedules regarding seals, conductors, and other system components.A successful preventive maintenance program can help a manufacturing facility reduce downtime, lessen the need for costly repairs, and increase productivity. After taking this class, users will understand the benefits of a preventive maintenance approach for fluid systems.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Hydraulic Power Variables 301

    • Hydraulic Power Variables provides users with a foundational knowledge of variable factors in hydraulic power and how the variables affect hydraulic systems. Hydraulic power variables are measurable or quantifiable characteristics of a hydraulic system or system component. The two most integral variables are fluid flow and pressure. Additional power variables include speed, horsepower, and torque. Changing any variable impacts the system's operation.After taking Hydraulic Power Variables, users will understand how the variables of a hydraulic system contribute to the manipulation of pressurized fluid in order to transmit power. Understanding the power variables allows hydraulic system operators to predict the performance of a system and select compatible components.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Hydraulic Power Sources 302

    • Hydraulic Power Sources provides a detailed overview of the most common hydraulic pumps used in hydraulic systems. A hydraulic pump is the power source of a hydraulic system and requires a prime mover, such as a motor or engine, in order to create fluid flow. Hydraulic pumps include positive-displacement pumps such as gear pumps, vane pumps, and piston pumps. A hydraulic power source relies on many components that work together to form a complete hydraulic system.A foundational knowledge of hydraulic pumps is essential to understanding how a hydraulic system functions. After taking this class, users will have a comprehensive understanding of hydraulic pumps and pump ratings, such as flow capacity, pressure, and efficiency.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Pneumatic Power Variables 311

    • The class Pneumatic Power Variables provides users with a foundational knowledge of pneumatic power and the pneumatic systems that generate it. Pneumatic power variables are measurable or quantifiable characteristics of a pneumatic system or system component. The two most integral variables are fluid flow and pressure. Additional power variables include speed, horsepower, and torque.After taking Pneumatic Power Variables users will understand how the different variables of a system affect the transmission of power in a system. Further they will understand how to evaluate and select the most appropriate and efficient components to power a pneumatic system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Pneumatic Power Sources 312

    • Pneumatic Power Sources provides a comprehensive overview of the compressors that allow a pneumatic system to perform work. Users will become familiar with the different types of compressors that may be used in a pneumatic system, as well as the various sources that power these compressors. Users will also gain an understanding of how each unique type of compressor impacts the efficiency and effectiveness of a pneumatic system.Jet engines, heavy construction equipment, and a variety of manufacturing tools would not be possible without compressors. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the different types of compressors that compress air, and the power sources that compressors to perform work.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Hydraulic Control Valves 341

    • Hydraulic Control Valves describes the three main types of control valves and their functions in a hydraulic system. Control valves control the direction, pressure, and flow rate of fluid as it moves through a hydraulic system. The proper placement of control valves contributes to the overall effectiveness of a hydraulic circuit. Hydraulic system operators use schematic diagrams when studying hydraulic circuits and control valves. Schematic diagrams include symbols for control valves and other system components.Understanding the functions of each type of hydraulic control valve and their proper placement within a hydraulic circuit helps ensure that a hydraulic system produces usable power. After taking this class, users will understand the main types of hydraulic control valves and their various functions. Users will also be able to identify schematic symbols for common control valves.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Hydraulic Schematics and Basic Circuit Design 342

    • Hydraulic Schematics and Basic Circuit Design provides an overview of basic hydraulic circuit configurations and the standard fluid symbols in fluid schematic diagrams. A hydraulic schematic diagram uses lines and symbols to provide a visual display of fluid paths within a hydraulic circuit. A hydraulic schematic also indicates the types and capabilities of components in the circuit. Basic hydraulic circuits use strategic placement of control valves and components to manipulate fluid and achieve specific results.A knowledge of standard fluid symbols and schematic diagrams is necessary in order to work with basic and complex hydraulic circuits. This course teaches users how to read a basic schematic diagram and how to relate a schematic diagram to a hydraulic circuit.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Pneumatic Control Valves 351

    • Pneumatic Control Valves provides an overview of different common pneumatic valves, including regulating, directional control, relief, flow control, and sequence valves. A pneumatic system uses these various types of valves to control the movement, pressure, direction, and flow rate of compressed air as it moves through the system. The types of valves used and their placement in a pneumatic system can maximize the system's potential to do work.Without pneumatic control valves, operators would not be able to assure the optimal air pressure and directional flow that allows the system to operate efficiently and safely. After taking Pneumatic Control Valves users will understand how different pneumatic valves affect the flow of pressurized air in a system. Further they will understand how to evaluate and select the most appropriate components to control pressurized air flow in a pneumatic system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Pneumatic Schematics and Basic Circuit Design 352

    • Basic Pneumatic Schematics and Circuit Design provides an overview of different common pneumatic schematic symbols, including air treatment symbols; pressure, flow, and direction valve symbols; and actuator symbols. Further, the class describes an overview of the design principles of a pneumatic circuit and the placement of components within a pneumatic schematic. Without pneumatic circuit design and schematic symbols, designers would not be able to communicate to an engineer the necessary component placement in order to achieve the work for a particular job. After taking Basic Pneumatic Schematics and Circuit Design users will understand basic design principles in a pneumatic circuit schematic and be able to recognize the symbols of basic circuit components.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Actuator Applications 361

    • Actuator Applications provides a comprehensive overview of the actuators used in industrial fluid power systems. Actuators convert fluid power into mechanical force at the end of a fluid circuit. Fluid power actuators consist of linear actuators, rotary actuators, hydraulic motors, and pneumatic motors. Linear actuators exert linear force, while rotary actuators, hydraulic motors, and pneumatic motors exert rotary force.After taking this class, users will be familiar with the primary types and functions of fluid power actuators. An understanding of actuators helps fluid system operators handle the day-to-day operations of a fluid system.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Hydraulic Fluid Selection 371

    • Hydraulic Fluid Selection explains the primary functions and properties of the hydraulic fluid within a hydraulic system. Hydraulic fluid must lubricate components, seal clearances, dissipate heat, and transfer power as it flows through a fluid system. This class gives an overview of the types of hydraulic fluid used in industrial and mobile hydraulic systems. Hydraulic fluid is either petroleum-based oil, water-based, or synthetic. Selecting the hydraulic fluid for an application requires consideration of fluid properties and characteristics, such as the fluid's viscosity and whether it is compatible with system components.After taking this class, users will be familiar with common hydraulic fluids and their applications. A knowledge of hydraulic fluid helps prevent maintenance issues arising from fluid incompatibility and prevents downtime. Hydraulic system operators and technicians should be aware of hydraulic fluid selection guidelines.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Contamination and Filter Selection 381

    • Contamination and Filter Selection describes common contaminants that may affect a fluid system. Contaminants include solid particles, liquids, and energy. Hydraulic and pneumatic systems are both subject to contamination, but hydraulic systems are more susceptible due to their higher operating pressures and recirculation of fluid. Filters are used in a fluid system to clean fluid and control contamination. Filters are selected based on the target cleanliness for a system or component.A knowledge of the filter selection process helps fluid system operators to determine the most efficient and appropriate filter to use. Being aware of common contaminants that may damage a fluid system helps machine operators prevent malfunctions and reduces downtime.

  • Hydraulics and Pneumatics Hydraulic Principles and System Design 391

    • Hydraulic Principles and System Design provides an overview of the process used to design a basic hydraulic system. Hydraulic system design requires familiarity with the components of a hydraulic system and the various fluid power formulas used when sizing hydraulic components. Engineers use fluid power formulas to solve for variables such as horsepower, flow rate, and pressure.After taking this class, users will be familiar with the fluid power formulas used when designing a hydraulic system. A knowledge of fluid power formulas and hydraulic system design helps employees to correctly size components and perform troubleshooting.

  • Inspection Basic Measurement 101

    • The class Basic Measurement offers an overview of common gaging and variable inspection tools and methods. Variable inspection takes a specific measurement using common devices such as calipers and micrometers. The sensitivity of the instrument must be greater than the measurement being taken. Both calipers and micrometers are read by finding the alignments in lines on the devices. Gages, such as gage blocks, plug gages, ring gages, and thread gages, reveal whether a dimension is acceptable or unacceptable without a specific quantity. All inspection devices should be properly mastered and maintained to retain accuracy. One of the fundamental activities of any shop is the measurement of part features. Consistent measurement and inspection maintains standardization and ensures that out-of-tolerance parts do not reach customers. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the use and care of common inspection instruments and gages used in the production environment.

 

INSPECTION

  • Inspection Calibration Fundamentals 111

    • The class Calibration Fundamentals provides a basic introduction to the importance of calibrating measuring instruments. Calibration determines the accuracy of measuring instruments by comparing its value to a higher-level measurement standard, usually a working standard gage block. Measurement standards follow a hierarchy consisting of primary, secondary, and working standards. Traceability links these standards together. Measurement uncertainty estimates the accuracy of a measurement. It is the range in which the true value of a measurement is expected to lie. High-accuracy parts require tight tolerances. Tighter tolerances require higher-accuracy measuring instruments. While uncertainty and error exists in every measurement, careful calibration can help to minimize inaccuracy when inspecting parts with measuring instruments. After taking this class, users should be able to explain how calibration and traceability impact the use and care of inspection devices.

  • Inspection Basics of Tolerance 121

    • Basics of Tolerance provides a comprehensive overview on part tolerancing, including different types of tolerances and the relationship between tolerances and part dimensions. Every manufactured part must meet certain specifications. Tolerances describe the range of acceptable measurements in which a part can still perform its intended function. Tolerance ranges typically describe a linear measurement. Surface texture can require a certain tolerance as well. Tolerances attempt to balance the use of a product with the cost required to produce that product.Improper tolerancing can result in parts that do not function in the way they were intended or parts produced with dimensions that are more precise than necessary, adding unwanted cost to production. After the class, users will be able to describe common methods used for part tolerancing, as well as the impact tolerances have on part production and quality.

  • Inspection Blueprint Reading 131

    • The class Blueprint Reading provides a thorough understanding of blueprints and how to read them. Blueprints are documents that contain three major elements: the drawing, dimensions, and notes. The drawing illustrates the views of the part necessary to show its features. Together, the extension and dimension lines on the drawing indicate dimensions and specific tolerance information of each feature. The notes contain administrative and global information about the part. A blueprint contains all instructions and requirements necessary to manufacture and inspect a part.An understanding of how to read a blueprint is critical to manufacture and inspect parts to accurate specifications. Accurate blueprint creation helps to ensure that finished parts will function in a way that meets the original intent. After taking this class, users should be able to read a basic blueprint and determine the critical features on a part that need to be measured.

  • Inspection Hole Standards and Inspection 141

    • The class Hole Standards and Inspection provides a comprehensive introduction to hole inspection using contact instruments. Hole inspection ensures that a hole will meet its proper job specifications, including fit, diameter, roundness, and condition. Gaging instruments, like pin and plug gages, determine fit. Variable instruments determine size and must make three points of contact to find out-of-round conditions. Variable instruments may be mechanical, electronic, optical, or pneumatic. More complex handheld devices include telescoping gages, split-ball gages, calipers, inside micrometers, and bore gages. Job specifications, environmental concerns, and economic issues all determine which hole inspection device to use. Choosing the wrong tool could result in an out-of-tolerance hole passing inspection. After taking this class, users should be able to explain how to measure common hole features with plug gages, pin gages, and calipers and verify they are within tolerance.

  • Inspection Thread Standards and Inspection 151

    • Thread Standards and Inspection explains the various parts of threads and how to inspect them. Manufacturers inspect threads according to unified or ISO standards or using System 21, System 22, and System 23. Several features must be checked to make sure that threads meet specifications. Gaging inspection tools, or go/no-go gages, simply determine whether or not a part will fit. Variable thread inspection tools determine whether a thread falls within a specified tolerance range. Thread type and specifications affect the tools used to inspect threads.Understanding the various components and classifications used to identify threads is critical for accurate inspection. After the class, the user will be able to explain how to measure common threaded features with internal and external thread gages and verify the features are within tolerance.

  • Inspection Surface Texture and Inspection 201

    • The class Surface Texture and Inspection provides information on surface finish and methods involved for its inspection. The surface finish achieved by a machining process determines how well a surface performs its given function. Surface inspection compares the specified nominal surface and real surface to find the measured surface. Measurement can be completed by comparison, direct measurement with a stylus-type instrument, or noncontact methods. A real surface contains irregularities (flaws, roughness, waviness, and lay) that make up its surface texture. Roughness is the most common irregularity used to inspect surfaces. The desired finish of a surface changes how precisely a part must be machined. Inspecting for surface roughness reduces the cost of surface finish by allowing companies to produce parts to customer specifications. After the class, users should be able to describe commonly used methods for tolerancing a part's surface roughness in a production environment.

  • Inspection Nondestructive Testing 211

    • Nondestructive Testing 211 provides an overview of nondestructive testing and its six most common methods. Nondestructive testing (NDT) is the process of evaluating the quality and integrity of a manufactured part without harming its usability. There are six common NDT methods: visual testing, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, eddy current testing, radiographic testing, and ultrasonic testing. Each method requires a certified technician choosing appropriate variables, operating the equipment, and interpreting results.Despite NDT's many advantages, no one NDT method is capable of finding all types of flaws and defects in every type of part. As a result, manufacturers and inspection personnel must have a proper understanding of NDT and its most common methods in order to ensure it is used both effectively and reliably. After taking this class, users will be able to better understand NDT, its six most common methods, and the appropriate applications of each.

  • Inspection Measuring System Analysis 300

    • This class explains the purpose and methods of measuring systems analysis, including measurement variation and gage repeatability and reproducibility studies.

  • Inspection Introduction to GD&T 301

    • Introduction to GD&T provides a basic introduction to the symbols and terminology of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, or GD&T. GD&T is an international design standard that uses 14 standard geometric tolerances to control the shape of features. GD&T emphasizes the fit, form, and function of a part by comparing the physical features of the part to the theoretical datums specified in the design instructions. Every part feature is described by a series of symbols organized in the feature control frame. Because GD&T's tolerance zones more accurately follow the shape of a feature, emphasizing the relationship between features, blueprints commonly utilize GD&T to describe parts. To fully understand a blueprint, it is necessary to know the GD&T symbols and their meaning. After taking this class, users will better understand the symbols commonly used in a GD&T print.

  • Inspection Major Rules of GD&T 311

    • Major Rules of GD&T provides an overview of the rules and concepts of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, or GD&T. The major rules include Rule #1, or the Envelope Principle, which specifies how size controls form, Rule #2, or RFS and RMB defaults, and the 3-2-1 Rule, which defines the minimum number of points of contact in the datum reference frame. In addition to these major rules, other concepts described are bonus tolerances, virtual and resultant conditions, and the components of the datum reference frame. GD&T functions as a complex language used in blueprints to convey necessary information about a part. GD&T standards offer specific guidelines for part features, including projected tolerance zones, radii, controlled radii, tapers, threads, and gears. To accurately read a GD&T print, users must understand its many rules and principles. After taking this class, users should be able to explain key GD&T concepts and approaches for part inspection.

  • Inspection GD&T Applications 312

    • Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) is a language used in part drawings and prints to convey all necessary information about a part. GD&T Applications provides an overview of how to interpret a part's tolerances with GD&T. Users must be familiar with basic symbols, rules, and principles of GD&T, including the datum system, to properly interpret tolerances. It is also important to understand how the assembly of a part influences its design, and how the accurate interpretation of tolerances informs inspection of a part.After taking the class, users will better understand how to interpret a feature control frame for various form, profile, orientation, location, and runout tolerances, and how to apply those tolerances to part creation and inspection.

  • Inspection Inspecting a Prismatic Part 321

    • Inspecting a Prismatic Part explains the measurements, methods, and inspection tools necessary to confirm that a prismatic part meets its specifications. A number of instruments have the right amount of sensitivity required to inspect most prismatic parts, but a CMM is often the most accurate. Inspection starts by measuring each size dimension in two ways: the cross-sectional dimension, or actual local size, and, sometimes, the actual mating envelope (AME). Prismatic parts are also routinely inspected for certain geometric tolerances, including straightness, flatness, profile of a line, profile of a surface, angularity, perpendicularity, parallelism, and position.The ways in which a part must be inspected is based largely upon its shape, so proper inspection of a prismatic part requires an understanding of its basic dimensions and tolerances. After taking this class, users will be able to describe best practices for inspecting the complete layout of a prismatic part.

  • Inspection Inspecting a Cylindrical Part 331

    • Inspecting a Cylindrical Part explains the measurements, methods, and inspection tools necessary to confirm that a cylindrical part meets its specifications. A number of instruments have the right amount of sensitivity required to inspect most cylindrical parts, but a CMM is often the most accurate. Inspection starts by measuring each size dimension in two ways: the cross-sectional dimension, or actual local size, at one location along the part and the actual mating envelope (AME) along the part’s entire length. Cylindrical parts are also routinely inspected for certain geometric tolerances.The ways in which a part must be inspected is based largely upon its shape. Thus proper inspection of a cylindrical part requires an understanding of its basic dimensions and tolerances. After the class users should be able to describe best practices for inspecting the complete layout of a cylindrical part.

  • Inspection Advanced Hole Inspection 341

    • Advanced Hole Inspection provides an overview of hole inspection using noncontact instruments. Holes that require a specific type of fit, either clearance, interference, or transition, also require a higher degree of accuracy. Noncontact hole inspection devices provide this, as well as an ability to measure fragile parts and high volumes of parts. These more sophisticated variable hole inspection devices include coordinate measuring machines, measuring microscopes, optical comparators, borescopes, laser systems, and air gages.Job specifications, part dimensions, and feature size all determine which hole inspection device to use on holes requiring a certain fit. Choosing a tool without a high degree of accuracy could result in an out-of-tolerance hole passing inspection. After taking this class, users will be able to describe advanced methods for inspecting hole dimensions and geometric features in a lab setting.

  • Inspection Inspecting with Optical Comparators 351

    • Inspecting with Optical Comparators provides an overview of the optical comparator, which uses optics to project an enlarged, two-dimensional shadow of a part onto a glass screen for measurement of its length, width, and surface. Simple optics display the part upside down and backwards. Corrected optics display the part right side up and backwards. Fully corrected optics yield an image identical to the part orientation. Regardless of type and complexity, all optical comparators measure by comparison, screen rotation, and motion.If optical comparators are properly maintained, measurement error is the result of the operator. By understanding the components and measurement methods of the optical comparator, operators can avoid unwanted variation. Variation in measurement can lead to faulty parts passing inspection and reaching consumers. After completing the class, users will be able to describe best practices for using the optical comparator to inspect parts.

  • Inspection Inspecting with CMMs 361

    • Inspecting with CMMs provides a comprehensive overview of the functions and mechanics of the coordinate measuring machine, or CMM. A CMM’s probe contacts the various features on a workpiece and records their Cartesian coordinate locations with software. CMMs measure using either contact or noncontact methods and can be used in a lab or on the production floor. CMMs use either manual operation, joystick, or DCC to guide components.As long as the operator is trained in its use, the CMM provides high accuracy measurements with minimum human influence in a very short amount of time. This allows the operator to respond to machining errors and reduce scrap. After this class, users should be able to describe best practices for using the CMM to inspect parts.

  • Inspection Introduction to CMM Arms 362

    • Introduction to CMM Arms provides an overview of the components and functions of a portable coordinate measuring machine arm, or CMM arm. Portable CMM arms are used to measure workpiece features and record their coordinate locations with software. CMM arms measure using either contact or noncontact methods and can be used in most environments on the production floor.CMM arms are used for many applications in manufacturing, including inspection, rapid prototyping, and reverse engineering processes. After taking this class, users will be able to describe CMM arms and best practices for using them.

  • Inspection Introduction to Laser Trackers 365

    • Introduction to Laser Trackers provides an overview of the components, functions, and applications of laser trackers. A laser tracker is a type of portable coordinate measuring machine (CMM) that is used to measure large-scale workpiece features and record their geometry. Laser trackers gather measurements by sending a laser beam to a retroreflective target and can be used in most environments on the production floor. Additionally, operators use handheld probes to measure out-of-sight areas and record 6DoF measurements.Laser trackers are used for many applications in manufacturing, including inspection, GD&T analysis, and reverse engineering processes. After taking this class, users will be able to describe laser trackers and how they function.

  • Inspection Calibration and Documentation 371

    • Calibration and Documentation details the calibration of measuring instruments and its necessary documentation. Calibration should occur at regular intervals. Companies should have a written document that defines their calibration procedures. Calibration records and reports ensure that traceability is intact. This documentation proves that measurements are accurate. The required accuracy of the measuring instrument determines in-house or outside calibration. Without traceability, there is no way to ensure that a measurement made by an inspection device is accurate.Calibration and documentation reduce waste and increase part accuracy, which in turn increases customer satisfaction. After taking the class, users should be able to describe best practices for instrument and gage calibration, along with correct documentation of calibration efforts.

  • Inspection Structured Light 3D Scanners 375

    • Structured Light 3D Scanners provides an overview of the components, functions, and applications of structured light scanners. A structured light scanner is a type of 3D optical measuring device used to record an object's geometry. Structured light scanners gather measurements by projecting an LED light pattern onto an object and capturing its shape with multiple cameras. The captured images are then reconstructed to create a 3D model.Structured light scanners are used for many applications in manufacturing, including inspection, GD&T analysis, and reverse engineering processes. After taking this class, users will be able to describe structured light scanners and how they function.

  • Inspection 3D Laser Scanners 376

    • 3D Laser Scanners provides an overview of the components, functions, and applications of laser line scanners. A laser line scanner is a type of 3D optical measuring device used to record an object's geometry. Laser line scanners gather measurements by projecting a single or multiple laser lines onto an object while a camera captures its reflection. The scanned point data is used to construct a 3D model in real time.3D laser line scanners are used for many applications in manufacturing, including inspection, GD&T analysis, and reverse engineering processes. After taking this class, users will be able to describe 3D laser line scanners and how they function.

  • Inspection In-Line Inspection Applications 381

    • In-Line Inspection Applications offers an in-depth look at the uses of in-line inspection, or error-proofing, in a production environment. Error-proofing uses individualized setups to inspect a part while it is still in production. Gage selection for in-line inspection depends on variables such as part type, production specifics, environment, and process control needs. Possible gaging options include limit or proximity switches, counters or timers, photoelectric or laser sensors, air gages, machine vision systems, and ultrasonic systems. In-line inspection is only feasible if it can be done with repeatability and accuracy.Inspection of parts during production, instead of after it is complete, allows a company to prevent errors before they occur and reach customers. After taking the class, users should be able to describe the various methods for incorporating in-line inspection into an established production process.

  • Inspection Intro to GD&T 200 (1994)

    • This class introduces the fundamental concepts of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) and describes the main types of tolerances included in the standard. This class references the 1994 standard. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Inspection Interpreting GD&T 310 (1994)

    • This class explains important rules of GD&T and also describes how common features are specified in GD&T prints. This class references the 1994 standard. Includes an Interactive Lab.

 

LEAN

  • Lean Lean Manufacturing Overview 101

    • Lean Manufacturing Overview provides an introduction to the principles and terminology of lean strategies, including a discussion of the seven forms of waste, the definition of value-added, the difference between push and pull systems, and the importance of continuous improvement. This class also highlights other quality concepts, such as single minute exchange of dies (SMED), inventory reduction, and Five S.Lean manufacturing approaches help companies optimize their processes through organization and waste reduction. Although change can be a challenge, more efficient, streamlined processes will ultimately lead to improved customer satisfaction. This class outlines the foundational concepts and vocabulary that every practitioner needs when beginning, or continuing, a lean initiative.

  • Lean Continuous Process Improvement: Managing Flow 124

    • This class covers the principles of continuous process improvement and the tools used to implement it.

  • Lean Continuous Process Improvement: Identifying and Eliminating Waste 125

    • This class covers process improvement through the identification and elimination of different kinds of waste.

  • Lean Developing a Lean Culture 135

    • This class covers strategies and tools for developing a lean culture within your company.

  • Lean Total Productive Maintenance 141

    • Total Productive Maintenance introduces users to TPM concepts and principles. This class provides an overview of each key TPM pillar, including autonomous maintenance, Five S, planned maintenance, quality maintenance, kaizen, training, safety, and office TPM. TPM combines aspects from lean manufacturing and quality initiatives to create a blended maintenance approach for both production and administrative areas. Improved safety, longer machine life, and increased employee involvement are just a few benefits of a well-executed TPM strategy. After taking this course, users will be able to describe the key components of total productive maintenance and their role in continuous improvement.

  • Lean 5S Overview 151

    • Five S Overview provides a thorough introduction to the purpose and process of 5S quality initiatives. This class includes separate discussions on each of the five steps, along with information on challenges, advantages, and possible assessment tools.Many companies implement quality initiatives to improve operations and eliminate waste. 5S is a quality method that promotes organization, efficiency, and team work through several sequential steps. After completing this class, users will understand the value of each 5S step and be better equipped to execute and evaluate 5S.

  • Lean Cell Design and Pull Systems 161

    • Cell Design and Pull Systems provides an introduction to the origin, purpose, and advantages of cellular manufacturing. This class describes the basic characteristics of a work cell, along with how cells are planned, organized, and improved. Cell Design and Pull Systems also includes a discussion of related quality concepts, such as takt time, cycle time, kanban systems, and error prevention. Work cells have become an integral component of many lean facilities due to their ability to streamline operations and decrease lead time. However, cells require planning, organization, and constant team effort. In order for the system to work, everyone must know his or her role in the cell. With this class, someone new to cellular manufacturing will be able to identify the benefits of work cells, use common quality terminology, and understand how supporting strategies, such as kanban and kaizen, come together to create an effective quality system.

  • Lean Intro to Six Sigma 171

    • Intro to Six Sigma provides a comprehensive introduction to the goals, methods, and tools used during Six Sigma initiatives. This class discusses the different roles in a Six Sigma team, DMAIC steps, and how to identify variation. Intro to Six Sigma also covers the tools practitioners use to track and analyze data, such as Pareto charts, frequency distribution charts, and run charts. Unlike some quality initiatives, Six Sigma offers tangible, measurable methods to gage a project's success. This class gives new practitioners the foundational knowledge needed to support a Six Sigma project by introducing them to key terminology and important data analysis tools.

  • Lean Troubleshooting 181

    • Troubleshooting provides a comprehensive overview of various methods and tools used to troubleshoot problems. Troubleshooting often involves finding the root cause of a problem and being able to distinguish deviations from problems and early warning signs from warning signs. Many tools are used to collect and interpret troubleshooting data, including check sheets, fishbone diagrams, and Pareto charts. The 5 Why technique, brainstorming, documentation, and troubleshooting teams are common methods of gathering troubleshooting data. Troubleshooting teams gather data in order to find possible solutions. Teams must test solutions to make sure they offer long-term results.Troubleshooting is an extremely important skill for all areas of industry. The information provided in this class prepares students to solve problems and understand how to work to prevent them in many different settings. Without this knowledge, students would not be able to solve problems effectively.

  • Lean Conducting Kaizen Events 191

    • Conducting Kaizen Events provides a comprehensive overview of kaizen events and how they work. A kaizen event is a focused project conducted by a cross-functional team that targets a particular problem area. Kaizen events produce both quantitative and qualitative benefits, although there are some potential challenges. During a kaizen event, a team analyzes the current state of the target and plans improvements for the future state. Kaizen events require preparation, training, and follow up.Kaizen events are an important part of lean manufacturing that often lead to dramatic changes and significant results. Kaizen events optimize processes and eliminate waste, which improves quality and reduces costs. After taking this class, students will have a foundational understanding of why kaizen events are held and what happens during a kaizen event. This familiarity prepares students to participate in, and eventually lead, kaizen events.

  • Lean SPC Overview 211

    • SPC Overview offers a thorough introduction to the purpose and main concepts of statistical process control (SPC). This class describes different types of control charts, such as X bar, R, and P charts, and how these tools are used to determine if a process is in-control or out-of-control. Identifying and eliminating special cause variation is essential to creating quality products and reducing waste. SPC methods are an efficient, effective means to track variation and monitor processes. With SPC tools, manufacturers have the ability to find and fix issues before they lead to product problems. After taking this course, new and current personnel will understand commonly used control charts and recognize out-of-control signs, making them better equipped to contribute to quality control efforts at their facility.

  • Lean Metrics for Lean 231

    • Metrics for Lean provides an introduction to the information and data used to track processes in lean manufacturing facilities, including takt time, cycle time, total time of operations, overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), and first-time quality. Metrics are measurable variables that can be tracked over time in order to identify errors or gauge progress. In lean facilities, metrics are tools manufacturers use to identify non-value added activities, streamline operations, and improve operations. After taking this class, users will be able to distinguish between broad and narrow metrics and calculate key values such as takt time and OEE. Understanding this information will help users contribute to lean initiatives and everyday continuous improvement efforts.

  • Lean Process Flow Charting 241

    • Process Flow Charting provides an overview of the types and purposes of flow charts, including spaghetti diagrams, process maps, and value stream maps. This class describes the value of current- and future-state charts and how they contribute to quality initiatives.Process flow charts are a means to identify waste and inefficiencies in the production process. Choosing a flow chart depends on the needs and goals of the manufacturer; some charts use symbols and incorporate metrics, while others can simply be drawn by watching activities in the facility. With this class, new practitioners will learn about the development and use of flow charts and be better prepared to utilize these tools.

  • Lean Strategies for Setup Reduction 251

    • The class Strategies for Setup Reduction presents several common strategies for decreasing setup, the activities required to prepare a product for processing. The single minute exchange of dies (SMED) method, which strives to reduce setups to under 10 minutes, is a core approach to setup reduction. SMED focuses on transitioning internal steps to external steps, which can be performed while machines are running. Additional SMED practices include using setup teams in parallel operations and prepping tools, paperwork, and materials. Standardization and special devices like one-turn and one-touch fasteners and intermediate jigs also help reduce setup times. Setup reduction is one of the many goals of lean manufacturing. Reducing setup times allows manufacturers to perform more setups for smaller, more-varied batches so that they can better respond to customer demands. After taking this class, users should be familiar with methods and understand the importance of setup reduction.

  • Lean Total Quality Management Overview 261

    • Total Quality Management discusses the major principles of total quality management (TQM). TQM evolved from quality assurance methods, which emphasize quality by design. TQM is a management philosophy that focuses on customer satisfaction, since customers define quality. Efforts to improve quality are integrated throughout each stage of the industrial cycle. Leadership is responsible for creating and executing a strategic TQM plan, as well as establishing an open company culture that involves and empowers all employees. There are many methods that can be used to measure, analyze, and implement TQM.A company can be successful only if its customers are satisfied. TQM helps companies stay competitive by establishing a culture focused on customer satisfaction and continuous improvement. After taking this class, users should understand the importance of TQM and be prepared to contribute to total quality efforts in the workplace.

  • Lean Management Tools: Problem Solving 270

    • This class covers lean tools that managers can use for problem solving and root cause analysis.

  • Lean Management Tools: Product and Process Design 275

    • This class covers lean tools for managing product and process design.

  • Lean Value Stream Mapping: The Current State 301

    • Value Stream Mapping: The Current State provides an introduction to the tools and process of value stream mapping. This course explains common value stream mapping (VSM) icons, the steps to creating a VSM, and outlines how to calculate key metrics, such as cycle time, parts per hour, and capacity. Users will also be guided through the development of a current state VSM for a company making a low-variety/high-volume product.Isolating and eliminating waste are critical to achieving streamlined operations in lean manufacturing. Current and future state value stream maps are one tool companies can use to track their processes and make plans for improvement. After taking this course, users will be able to identify VSM icons, calculate critical metrics, and contribute to current state VSM development.

  • Lean Six Sigma Goals and Tools 310

    • This class covers the Six Sigma DMAIC process improvement method and its primary goals, including the most common sub-steps and frequently used tools.

  • Lean Value Stream Mapping: The Future State 311

    • Value Stream Mapping: The Future State builds on concepts users used in Value Stream Mapping: The Current State. This class describes how to develop a future state value stream map, including how to evaluate a current state value stream map, target problem areas, and design a plan to reduce non-value added activities.A value stream map (VSM) is a process flow chart that manufacturers use to identify waste. The first step in value stream mapping is to create a current state map that represents the present flow of the facility. The next step is to identify areas of waste and develop a future state map. Future state maps represent changes the company can make to improve the facility's layout, production management, and communication systems. Reducing waste and streamlining processes is a goal in all manufacturing facilities. After completing these courses, users will be able to create VSMs and contribute to quality improvement efforts.

  • Lean Maintaining a Consistent Lean Culture 330

    • This class covers the methods and tools for maintaining a consistent lean culture within an enterprise.

  • Lean Transforming Lean into Business Results 340

    • This class teaches key processes and systems that optimize value flow and therefore produce optimum results in a lean system.

  • Lean Measuring Lean Systems 350

    • This class covers the metrics for measuring lean systems.

 

MANUAL MACHINING

  • Manual Machining Manual Mill Basics 201

    • Manual Mill Basics provides an introduction to the manual milling machine. Manual mills are generally either vertical or horizontal, depending on their spindle orientation. This class introduces the machine components, cutting tools and workholding devices commonly used on milling machines. The class also provides an overview of the various controls on the mill that are used to adjust spindle rotation, speed, feed, and depth.Before learning to operate a manual mill, it is necessary to have a basic understanding of the machine tool components as well as the cutting tools and workholding devices that may be used on the machine. The manual mill is a complex machine with many controls and variables, and familiarity is key to becoming a successful operator.

  • Manual Machining Engine Lathe Basics 211

    • Engine Lathe Basics provides an introduction to the components and controls used on a manual lathe. The lathe creates cylindrical parts by producing a round diameter on a part by rotating a workpiece against a stationary single-point cutting tool. The engine lathe, operated manually, is composed of a bed, ways, headstock, spindle, tailstock, carriage assembly, and leadscrew. Workholding devices are attached to the spindle to hold the workpiece as the carriage moves the cutting tool parallel or perpendicular to the workpiece. Cutting operations performed on the lathe include outer diameter (OD) operations and inner diameter (ID) operations.To produce parts on a manual lathe, the operator must first understand the lathe’s basic components and functions. After the class users should be able to describe the general machine components and controls of a manual engine lathe and their basic function.

  • Manual Machining Manual Mill Setup 221

    • Manual Mill Setup details important considerations that a mill operator must make before starting any cutting process as well as the steps an operator must follow to ensure proper manual mill setup. Mill setup requires operators to know how to select appropriate cutting variables and tools, align various mill components and a workpiece, use an edge finder and readout, and determine part zero. Correct setup is critical for cutting precisely and accurately dimensioned parts.Performing cutting operations on a mill with incorrect setup up results in reduced part quality and increased scrap production and manufacturing costs. After taking this class, a user should be able to accurately select process variables as well as correctly perform manual mill setup.

  • Manual Machining Engine Lathe Setup 231

    • Engine Lathe Setup details important considerations that a lathe operator must take before starting any cutting process as well as the steps to ensure proper engine lathe setup. Lathe setup requires operators to know how to select appropriate cutting variables and tools, align various lathe components and a workpiece, and zero the tool. Correct setup is critical for cutting precisely to create parts with accurate dimensions.Performing turning operations on a lathe with incorrect or inadequate setup results in reduced part quality and increased scrap production and manufacturing costs. After taking this class, a user should be able to accurately select process variables as well as correctly perform engine lathe setup.

  • Manual Machining Benchwork and Layout Operations 241

    • Benchwork and Layout Operations provides a detailed overview of the various benchwork and layout processes that operators often need to perform during manual machining. Layout is the process of marking a workpiece prior to cutting in order to have a visual guideline during cutting operations. Benchwork includes various cutting processes that machinists complete by hand rather than on a machine when creating part features that require less power and force. Common benchwork operations include hand tapping, hand reaming, hand filing, and engraving.Manually machined workpieces often require benchwork and layout operations. As a result, benchwork and layout are essential skills to have for any manual mill operator. A knowledge of not just how, but also when and why to perform benchwork and layout operations is key to becoming a skilled manual machinist and producing precise, accurate manually cut parts.

  • Manual Machining Manual Mill Operation 251

    • Manual Mill Operation serves as a guide for manually machining various features onto a workpiece. The class takes the users through the steps of creating a part on the manual mill, including determining the order of operations, squaring the six sides, creating a step, grooving, center drilling, and drilling. It focuses on step-by-step instructions on how to perform each operation to result in a part that is symmetrical and within tolerance. These steps can be applied to various face milling, end milling, and holemaking operations, allowing students to create precise parts through manual milling.A broad knowledge of not only how to operate a manual milling machine, but why each step in the operations process is used, is key for any machinist. This class will speed up the time it takes for new operators to learn manual milling and reduce user errors.

  • Manual Machining Engine Lathe Operation 261

    • Engine Lathe Operation serves as a guide for manually machining various features onto a workpiece. The class establishes principles of basic lathe operation and takes users through procedures for common outer diameter operations, including turning, facing, taper turning, knurling, parting off, grooving, and threading, and inner diameter operations, such as drilling, boring, reaming, and tapping. It focuses on step-by-step instructions on how to perform each operation, allowing students to create precise parts on the engine lathe.A broad knowledge of not only how to operate an engine lathe, but also the importance of each step in an operation, is key for any machinist. This class will speed up the time it takes for students to learn to operate an engine lathe and also reduce operator errors.

  • Manual Machining Holemaking on the Manual Mill 271

    • Holemaking on the Manual Mill provides information on the principles and processes for various holemaking operations that the manual milling machine can perform. A manual mill is capable of a number of precise holemaking operations, including drilling, tapping, reaming, counterboring, countersinking, and boring. Each holemaking operation requires different tools, preparation, and operation.Machinists commonly perform holemaking operations on the manual mill and must perform them accurately to produce parts that are within tolerance. If holemaking operations are not precise and accurate, assembly of the part will be impossible, leading to increased scrap. Manual machinists must understand how to carry out the various holemaking operations in order to reduce costs and increase quality.

  • Manual Machining Threading on the Engine Lathe 301

    • The class Threading on the Engine Lathe explains threads and how to make them using a manual lathe. Engine lathes can create both external (OD) and internal (ID) threads classified according to either Unified or ISO metric standards. To manually machine a thread a machinist must know how to set up and use a threading tool, compound rest, and quick-change gearbox before engaging the threading feed by moving the half-nut lever to the proper line on the threading dial. Machinists should also know how to perform initial operations such as chamfering and making an undercut. In order to cut threads successfully on the lathe, an operator must understand the various lathe components and processes used for threading. After taking this class, users should be able to describe best practices for external and internal threading on an engine lathe.

  • Manual Machining Taper Turning on the Engine Lathe 311

    • Taper Turning on the Engine Lathe describes how to machine common types of tapers on an engine lathe. Cylindrical tapers are a uniform change in diameter on a cylindrical object and help to align and hold various tools and workholding devices. A taper's angle is commonly expressed by taper per inch or foot, and the class covers these measurement types. It also describes the most common taper turning methods performed on the engine lathe: using a taper attachment, using the compound rest, and offsetting the tailstock. Each method has advantages and disadvantages.Taper turning is a common but advanced machining process. If a machine operator does not select the appropriate method for turning a specific taper or fails to execute the turning operation correctly, it will lead to scrapped parts and wasted labor. After taking the course, users will understand the processes to create external and internal tapers on the engine lathe.

 

MATERIALS

  • Materials Introduction to Physical Properties 101

    • Introduction to Physical Properties provides an overview of manufacturing materials and their physical properties, including thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties. This class also introduces users to volumetric characteristics, such as mass, weight, and density. Physical properties determine how a material will react to moisture, heat, electricity, and other factors. In order to choose the best tooling or raw material for an application, manufacturers must understand the physical properties of key metals, plastics, and other materials. After taking this course, users will be able to identify and describe key physical properties and their value in a manufacturing setting.

  • Materials Introduction to Mechanical Properties 111

    • Introduction to Mechanical Properties provides a thorough introduction to key mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, hardness, ductility, and impact resistance. This class discusses how shear, compression, and tensile stress impact a material's properties, how force is shown on a stress-strain graph, and common methods manufacturers use to test a material's strength. To make quality products, manufacturers must anticipate how a material responds to shaping and cutting forces and understand how that material will ultimately function once it reaches the customer. Evaluating a material's mechanical and physical properties is the first step to choosing reliable tooling and processing methods. After taking Introduction to Mechanical Properties, users will know more about hardness, ductility, and strength, what materials exhibit these characteristics, and common methods a facility might use to test these qualities.

  • Materials Introduction to Metals 121

    • Intro to Metals provides an overview of popular ferrous and nonferrous metals and their properties. This course introduces users to the three types of metal crystal structures, how grains develop in metal, the purpose of heat treating, and how these aspects impact a material's characteristics. Steel, aluminum, titanium, and other metals have a wide range of commercial and advanced applications, including structural shapes, machine components, and medical devices. To choose the best material for a project, manufacturers must first understand how different metals respond to heat, pressure, electricity, chemical exposure, and weather. After completing Intro to Metals, users will know how various metals function in different environments, making them better equipped to select materials and tooling.

  • Materials Introduction to Plastics 131

    • The class Introduction to Plastics provides an overview of plastic and its properties. This course introduces users to thermoplastics and thermosets, physical and mechanical properties, polymer structure and arrangement, manufacturing methods, and common additives.Plastic has a wide range of commercial applications, including widespread usage in the medical field and the automotive industry. To choose the best plastic for a product, manufacturers must understand the physical and mechanical properties of a specific type of plastic. After completing Introduction to Plastics, users will understand how various plastics function and how they are used in different applications.

  • Materials Metal Manufacturing 140

    • This class walks through the steps used to produce commercial steel from its original ore.

  • Materials Introduction to Ceramics 141

    • Introduction to Ceramics provides an overview of the general categories of ceramics and their properties. This course introduces physical and mechanical properties, atomic structure, and different types of traditional and advanced ceramics, as well as processing and manufacturing methods and end-user applications.Ceramics is a growing field in modern manufacturing and continuously provides new substitutes for traditional materials such as metals and plastics. An understanding of different types of ceramics' unique properties is necessary in order to know their appropriate applications. After completing this course, users will understand various ceramic qualities, manufacturing methods, and specific uses.

  • Materials Introduction to Composites 151

    • Introduction to Composites provides an overview of composite materials and their properties. This course introduces the variety of different matrix and reinforcement materials available, their specific mechanical and physical properties, as well as their use in engineering and advanced composites. This course also describes the benefits and drawbacks of using polymer-, metal-, ceramic-, and carbon-matrix composite materials and discusses appropriate applications for each.Composites are popular manufacturing materials due to their ability to exceed the properties of any individual material. An understanding of the different types of composites is necessary in order to know their appropriate applications. After completing this course, users will be able to distinguish between the different types of composites and understand their specific uses.

  • Materials Polymer Composite Processes 152

    • Polymer Composite Processes discusses the various common manufacturing methods for processing polymer-matrix composites (PMCs). Polymer-matrix composites are processed most frequently using open or closed molding methods. Open molding processes, which use a single-sided mold to shape a composite part, include lay-up molding, spray-up molding, and filament winding. Closed molding processes, which use a two-sided mold to shape composite material, include compression, injection, reaction injection, and resin transfer molding as well as pultrusion. The type and form of matrix materials affect which processes are appropriate to use.Polymer-matrix composites are the most widely utilized composites in manufacturing. An understanding of the various processes used to create PMC parts is essential for any composite technician. After taking this class, a user will be able to distinguish between the various polymer composite processes used in manufacturing today.

  • Materials Classification of Steel 201

    • Classification of Steel introduces users to steel designations systems, particularly AISI-SAE and UNS methods. This class describes classifications for plain carbon, alloy, high-strength low alloy, stainless, and tool steels, with a focus on AISI-SAE designations. There are many different types of steels, each having unique chemical contents and properties. Manufacturers distinguish between these metals by a numerical designation. In the AISI-SAE system, this number indicates the family of steel and the steel's carbon content. Some designations also describe the metal's intended use or special properties. Because composition and processing methods determine a metal's properties, understanding steel classification is critical to choosing the best material for an application. After this class, users will be able to distinguish between major types of steel classifications and describe the nomenclature used to identify various grades of steel.

  • Materials Essentials of Heat Treatment of Steel 211

    • Essentials of Heat Treatment provides a through introduction to steel heat treatment, including a discussion of how heat and carbon content impact a steel's microstructure. This class also describes common heat treating methods, such as annealing, quenching, normalizing, and tempering.Steel is heat treated to adjust the metal's properties. Heat treatments can increase a steel's hardness or ductility, or relieve stresses that accumulate due to other processing steps. To choose the best heat treating method for an application, manufacturers must understand how heat and carbon dictate phase changes and how different processes can be combined to produce a desired property. After completing this course, users will be familiar with heat treating theories and processes and be better equipped to use heat treatments.

  • Materials Hardness Testing 221

    • Hardness Testing provides a thorough overview of the most common hardness testing methods, including Rockwell, Brinell, Vickers, Knoop, rebound, and ultrasonic tests. This class presents a description of each method, along with discussions on how to choose and perform a test, how to read hardness ratings, and how to prevent common errors. Hardness tests ensure that raw, in-process, and finished materials have the correct mechanical properties. There are many different testing methods depending on the type of material, the work environment, and the desired accuracy of the reading. This course will prepare new and practicing manufacturers to choose and conduct different hardness tests by introducing them to popular methods used in the industry.

  • Materials Ferrous Metals 231

    • Ferrous Metals discusses the properties and applications of cast iron and steel, including an overview of plain carbon steel, stainless steel, and HSLA steels, along with an introduction to AISI-SAE designations. This course also describes gray, ductile, white, and malleable cast irons and their uses. Ferrous metals have broad commercial and industrial applications due to their strength, versatility, and relatively low costs. Fasteners, automotive components, structural shapes, tooling, and even aircraft parts can be made with ferrous metals. Understanding the range of cast iron and steels available enables manufacturers to choose reliable raw materials and effective processing methods. After completing this course, users will be better equipped to evaluate materials and anticipate how ferrous metals will function in different environments.

  • Materials Nonferrous Metals 241

    • Nonferrous Metals provides an overview of the properties and uses of common nonferrous metals, including aluminum, copper, magnesium, nickel, lead, and titanium. This class also discusses how refractory metals and how nonferrous metals are classified in the Unified Numbering System (UNS). Selecting the best alloy for an application begins with understanding each metal's properties and interactions. Nonferrous metals, although not as widely used as steel, are still valued as essential alloying elements or for advanced applications. After taking this class, new or practicing manufacturers will be able to identify various nonferrous metals, their characteristics, and their uses.

  • Materials Thermoplastics 251

    • Thermoplastics discusses the properties and applications of thermoplastics, including an overview of the amorphous and semicrystalline molecular regions found in thermoplastics. This course also describes common processing methods for thermoplastics, such as injection molding and extruding.Thermoplastics are the most prevalent type of plastic and as such it is crucial for employees to have a solid understanding of their properties and shaping processes. After taking this class, users will be able to identify different types of thermoplastics and common manufacturing methods.

  • Materials Principles of Injection Molding 255

    • This class will familiarize you with injection molding and the design concerns associated with injection molding.

  • Materials Thermosets 261

    • Thermosets introduces users to the key characteristics and types of thermosets as well as common processing methods. A thermoset is a strong, rigid plastic with a cross-linked molecular structure that makes it difficult to recycle and re-use. Common thermosets include phenolics, epoxies, polyester, polyurethane, silicone, and elastomers. Many composites use thermosets as the binding matrix to create a thermally stable material. Thermosets may be molded or cast using a variety of shaping processes.After taking this class, users will understand thermosets' basic applications, unique behaviors, structures, and processing methods. This knowledge allows users to select the best thermoset for an application.

  • Materials Principles of Thermoforming 265

    • This class describes the thermoforming process and explains the different variations of thermoforming, including pressure forming and vacuum forming.

  • Materials Exotic Alloys 301

    • Exotic Alloys provides an introduction to the properties and applications of superalloys and exotic metal alloys. In this class, users will learn about iron-based, nickel-based, and cobalt-based superalloys, as well as tungsten, vanadium, tantalum, and other exotic metals. Superalloys and exotic metals have unique properties for specialized applications. Complex, proprietary superalloys are commonly used in aerospace and petrochemical applications, while exotic metals are often used as alloying elements to enhance the properties of a base metal. After completing this class, users will be able to identify prominent superalloys and exotic metals and describe their uses.

 

MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

  • Mechanical Systems Introduction to Mechanical Systems 101

    • Introduction to Mechanical Systems provides a foundational overview of mechanical systems. Simple machines, such as the lever, incline planed, and wheel, are the building blocks of even the most complex mechanical systems. Both simple and complex machines manipulate mechanical forces, including distance and friction, in order to achieve mechanical advantage.Understanding how simple machines work is essential to understanding and working with any type of machinery. This includes being familiar with each type of simple machine as well as its components, function, and mechanical advantage, all of which serve as the basis for understanding advanced mechanical topics. Without the foundational information presented in this class, users will not be prepared to study more complex aspects of mechanical systems.

  • Mechanical Systems Safety for Mechanical Work 111

    • The class Safety for Mechanical Work provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with working on any mechanical system, including the possibility for falls, fires, electrocution, or crushing injuries when entering a machine. In addition, contact with certain machine fluids can cause skin and eye irritation. Many machines require machine guards because the operator works in close proximity with the point of operation and moving components. Injuries often occur when operators start machines without knowing that someone is performing maintenance.After taking the class, a user should be able to demonstrate awareness of and follow proper safety protocols while working on machines. Being aware of potential safety hazards reduces an operator's risk of injury. The key to safely maintaining machines is to perform proper lockout/tagout procedures, follow established safety guidelines, and maintain a well-organized, safe work environment.

  • Mechanical Systems Forces of Machines 121

    • Forces of Machines provides a comprehensive overview of the physical forces behind machine functions. All machines are based on the science of mechanics, which deals with the effects of different forces that either cause or prevent motion. Understanding the different types of forces, the physical laws that define them, and the ways in which they are measured is crucial to understanding machine functions.Understanding how machines work is essential to working with and performing maintenance upon any type of machinery. This includes the ability to distinguish between contact and non-contact forces, linear and rotary motion, speed and velocity, and scalar and vector quantities, all of which serve as a basis for more advanced mechanical topics. After completing this class, users will be prepared to both work with and study more complex aspects of mechanical systems.

  • Mechanical Systems Power Transmission Components 201

    • Power Transmission Components provides an overview of various components used to transmit energy through mechanical systems. Many systems use gear trains, belt drive systems, chain drives systems, or a combination of these to transfer energy from a power source to a point of use. Industrial applications requiring frequent stopping and starting and varying operational speeds use clutching mechanisms controlled by manual or automatic transmissions.As certain power transmission components are best suited for certain applications, manufacturers must determine which components are most appropriate for a given situation. Understanding advantages and disadvantages of various components based on operating speeds, load capacity, and other factors helps ensure efficient operations. Professionals in manufacturing should understand the basics of power transmission in all its variations.

  • Mechanical Systems Mechanical Power Variables 202

    • Mechanical Power Variables covers the changeable aspects of mechanical power. Basic power variables include speed, power, torque, horsepower, and mechanical forces. All machines rely on rotary motion, linear motion, or a combination of the two to perform work, and different power variables relate to each type of motion. Effectively converting one form of motion to another requires a clear understanding of the functional and mathematical relationship between the two forms.Machine operators and maintenance personnel must often determine which power components are most suitable for specific operations, evaluate machine efficiency, and determine when machine components should be replaced. Familiarity with power variables and their effects can help to prevent machine downtime and component failure. After taking this class, users will understand the basic variables involved in power transmission so that they can use mechanical power properly, safely, and efficiently.

  • Mechanical Systems Lubricant Fundamentals 211

    • Lubricant Fundamentals describes different types of lubricants and appropriate uses for them in machines and mechanical systems. A variety of machines require proper lubrication in order to function safely and efficiently. Lubricants help prevent wear and ensure operational efficiency by decreasing friction between components in contact. Common industrial lubricants include oil, grease, and solid lubricants.Machine operators and maintenance personnel must understand basic lubricant properties so they can select, apply, and replace lubricants properly. They must also recognize signs of improper lubrication and be aware of proper maintenance, storage, and safety practices for lubricants. After completing this course, users will understand the advantages and disadvantages of different types of lubricants, their operational properties, and procedures for proper lubrication.

  • Mechanical Systems Bearing Applications 221

    • Bearing Applications provides an overview of the many different types of bearings used in mechanical applications. Bearings are an essential part of many applications because they provide movement and reduce friction. A variety of bearing types are available. Each type of bearing accepts different loads, works in specific ways, and requires the appropriate lubrication regimens and maintenance procedures. As a result, both an application's key variables and a bearing's capabilities must be assessed in order to choose the most appropriate bearing for the application's needs.Without proper application and maintenance, bearings will function less efficiently, increasing the chance for premature failure and downtime. A lack of knowledge will consequently slow production as well as add excess waste and cost to the process. After taking this class, a user should be able to accurately select bearings and take the measures necessary to ensure optimal bearing life.

  • Mechanical Systems Spring Applications 231

    • Spring Applications provides an overview of the many different types of springs used in mechanical systems. Springs are an essential part of many applications because they dampen forces, provide flexibility, control movement between machine parts, store potential energy, and release kinetic energy. A variety of spring types are available. Each type of spring accepts different loads and load rates. Both an application's key variables and a spring's capabilities must be assessed in order to choose the most appropriate spring for an application.Without proper operation and maintenance, springs will stretch or suffer irreparable damage. Springs can damage machinery and cause injury if they break or pop out of place during installation or removal. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the different spring types, their limitations and uses, and safe practices to follow for maintenance and installation.

  • Mechanical Systems Belt Drive Applications 241

    • Belt Drive Applications provides an overview of the many belts used in mechanical systems. Belt drives are essential to many applications since they transmit power, torque, and speed. A variety of belt types are available. Each functions at different speeds and transmits different amounts of power. The unique designs of different belts vary depending on application. As a result, both an application's key variables and a belt drive's capabilities must be assessed in order to choose the most appropriate belt drive.Without proper application and maintenance, belt drives will function less efficiently, increasing the chance for premature failure and downtime. Proper belt maintenance can speed production and reduce a process’s waste and cost. After taking this class, a user should be able to select appropriate belt drives and perform the maintenance necessary to ensure optimal belt drive life.

  • Mechanical Systems Gear Applications 251

    • Gear Applications provides an overview of the many different types of gears and gear drives used in mechanical applications. Gears are an essential part of many applications because they transmit power and motion as well as alter the speed, torque, or direction of mechanical energy. Gear design and the structure of gear drives vary depending upon their application. As a result, both an application's key variables and a gear's capabilities must be assessed in order to choose the most appropriate gear for the application's needs.Without proper application and maintenance, gears will function less efficiently, increasing the chance for premature failure and downtime. A lack of knowledge will consequently slow production as well as add excess waste and cost to the process. After taking this class, a user should be able to identify different gears, understand gear drive abilities, and possess the knowledge to safely operate gear systems.

  • Mechanical Systems Gear Geometry 261

    • Gear Geometry provides an overview of the important design features of common gears. Involute gears have teeth that are shaped by an involute curve. In order to work properly, involute gears must meet precise geometrical specifications. Gear geometry includes tooth profile, pressure angle, pitch circle, clearance, and backlash. A gear's geometry significantly affects the way in which it meshes with another gear in order to transmit power and motion.The geometry of a gear affects its ability to function correctly and consistently transmit power throughout a mechanical system. Understanding a gear's geometrical features is essential to ensuring gears mesh together properly. After taking this class, a user will be able to describe the basic involute design of gears, its purpose, and define necessary terms for gear specifications.

  • Mechanical Systems Clutch and Brake Applications 271

    • Clutch and Brake Applications covers the functionality of various clutch and brake types. Many industrial machines use clutches and brakes to cause or prevent the transfer of motion through mechanical systems. Understanding how different clutches and brakes function and how to choose appropriate components for a particular system is essential to regulating the safe and efficient transfer of energy. Clutches and brakes also work in conjunction with other power transmission components and must be properly maintained to prevent machine damage.Machine operators must determine which clutches and brakes are most suitable for an application based on machine loads, operating speeds, and the general type of machine application. They must also recognize signs of wear and determine when clutching and braking components should be repaired or replaced. After taking, this course, users will understand clutch and brake function, and appropriate procedures for safe clutch and brake operation.

 

METAL CUTTING

  • Metal Cutting Intro to EDM 100

    • This class introduces the process, components and machines of electric discharge machining.

  • Metal Cutting Safety for Metal Cutting 101

    • Safety for Metal Cutting provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with metal cutting operations, such as hot flying chips, broken tools, and rotating components. In addition, the class addresses contact with cutting fluids, which can cause skin and eye irritation, and machine guarding. Manual machines often require machine guards because the operator works in close proximity with the point of operation and moving components. CNC machines often have fixed guards, which prevent the operator from reaching into the point of operation. Also, operators must handle all sharp-edged tools properly.Awareness of potential safety hazards reduces the risk of operator injury. The key to cutting safety is to follow the proper guidelines for the facility and maintain a well-organized, safe work environment. After taking the class, users should be able to demonstrate awareness of and follow proper safety protocols in a metal-cutting environment.

  • Metal Cutting Cutting Processes 111

    • Cutting Processes provides an introductory overview of the common metal cutting operations. To those new to manufacturing and machining, familiarity with the basic machines, tools, and principles of metal cutting is essential. The class focuses on the most common machining tools, the saw, lathe, and mill, and the common processes performed on each, such as band sawing, turning, end milling, and drilling. Cutting Processes also offers an introduction to holemaking and describes the differences between inner and outer diameter operations.A basic, foundational knowledge of metal cutting processes is essential to gain understanding of more advanced information such as cutting theory, tool and workpiece material, cutting variables, and tool geometries. After taking this class, students should be able to identify the most common cutting processes, as well as the machines used to perform them.

  • Metal Cutting Overview of Machine Tools 121

    • Overview of Machine Tools provides an overview of the basic machine tools used in metal cutting operations. The class describes the appearance, components, and uses of lathes, mills, drill presses, saws, and broaches. Lathes and mills are described in detail, including the various types of cutting operations performed and the different types of tools commonly used on both machines.This class provides new users with the foundational information about machine tools and their uses that is necessary for users to gain familiarity with common metal cutting machines and knowledge of metal cutting theory and processes. A basic understanding of the types of machine tools used in metal cutting operations will prepare users for becoming machine operators.

  • Metal Cutting Intro to Screw Machining 160

    • This class identifies the common components and operations of the screw machine and compares common screw machine designs.

  • Metal Cutting Basic Cutting Theory 201

    • Basic Cutting Theory provides an introductory overview of metal cutting theory and chip formation. The most fundamental aspect of cutting theory is the use of a cutting tool to remove material in the form of chips. Cutting tools can be divided into single-point tools, commonly used on the lathe, and multi-point tools, commonly used in milling and holemaking. The shape and type of chip created by cutting indicates whether or not cutting conditions are optimized. Adjusting tool angles and cutting variables has the largest effect on chip creation and cutting conditions.Understanding how chips are formed and what factors change or optimize chip formation is essential to performing an effective metal cutting operation. Chip formation affects surface finish, part quality, and tool life, and thus has a large effect on manufacturing economy.

  • Metal Cutting Band Saw Operation 211

    • Band Saw Operation gives an in-depth description of the considerations required for band sawing operations. Band sawing is a common way to perform rough cuts on raw stock, and uses a continuous, flexible metal blade looped over machine wheels. Band sawing can be performed with a variety of blade materials and styles, including different tooth spacing and geometry. The specific blade type and cutting variables used depend on the specific workpiece and cutting operation.Band sawing can be an efficient, low-cost way to rough cut stock to size. However, in order to effectively perform band sawing operations, operators must be aware of factors such as blade material, tooth set, tooth form, tooth spacing, and optimal speed and feed settings. This class provides the information necessary to identify optimal band sawing variables and conditions.

  • Metal Cutting Introduction to Metal Cutting Fluids 221

    • Introduction to Metal Cutting Fluids provides an overview of the use of cutting fluids in machining operations, including basic fluid safety and maintenance. Appropriate cutting fluid selection depends on the specific cutting operation and workpiece material, among other factors. Basic types of cutting fluids include various combinations of oils, water, and chemicals. Each type is classified by its contents. After explaining the basic function of cutting fluid, the class describes each category of fluid and its benefits and drawbacks.Appropriate cutting fluid use and maintenance are key factors in the success of a cutting operation. Proper cutting fluid application can prolong tool life and improve finished part quality, reducing scrap and tool cost. Awareness of cutting fluid hazards and maintenance helps increase workplace safety and reduce fluid costs. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the common types of cutting fluids and describe their optimal use.

  • Metal Cutting Metal Cutting Fluid Safety 231

    • Metal Cutting Fluid Safety provides an overview of the safety concerns related to working with metal cutting fluids. Some of the ingredients in various cutting fluids, as well as microorganisms that can grow in them, can be harmful. Exposure can occur through skin contact, inhalation, or ingestion. This exposure can lead to skin and respiratory disorders, including long-term illness. Safety measures, including ventilation, PPE, sanitation, training, and fluid maintenance, can reduce exposure to contaminants.Manufacturers always want to ensure that operators are safe, that they are OSHA compliant, and that they do not lose productivity due to accidents. Operations using cutting fluids have specific safety concerns that must be addressed in order to maintain a safe work environment. After taking this class, users will know how to differentiate between various cutting fluids, recognize the health risks they pose, and understand how to use, handle, and maintain them safely.

  • Metal Cutting Prints for Metal Cutting Operations 241

    • "Prints for Metal Cutting Operations" describes the appearance of manufacturing prints, how to interpret the information presented on the print, and the methods that an operator might use to create and measure various part features. Prints for metal cutting use a variety of symbols and shorthand to communicate all the information an operator will need to know to create a part, including dimensions of the part and important part features such as contours, tapers, and holes.An in-depth knowledge of how to read manufacturing prints is essential for any metal cutting operator. Being able to understand prints will also help to improve productivity and quality because operators will be able to quickly assess the best way to make a part and the order in which they should perform metal cutting operations. After taking this course, users will be able to recognize and interpret common print symbols and shorthand and determine how to physically create a part on a print.

  • Metal Cutting Overview of Deburring Processes 251

    • Overview of Deburring Processes provides an introduction to the various types of burrs and the methods of burr removal in modern manufacturing. Manual, mechanized, and automated deburring processes are commonly used for various workpieces. Each of these processes utilizes many of the same tools and methods, such as abrasive deburring and wire brushing.This class introduces users to the various deburring tools and processes that they may encounter in manufacturing settings, including how both manual tools and machines operate and what types of workpieces they are appropriate for. This foundational knowledge is necessary for any further learning or training in deburring.

  • Metal Cutting Toolholders for Turning 260

    • This class explains the components and identification of OD and ID toolholders used on the lathe.

  • Metal Cutting Speed and Feed for the Lathe 301

    • Speed and Feed for the Lathe provides a thorough explanation of cutting variables for lathe operations, including how these variables are measured, selected, and set. Many variables affect speed and feed selection, especially the type of cutting operation, tool material, and workpiece material. The class covers speed and feed selection for both manual and CNC machines.The proper selection of speed and feed is necessary to maximize tool life, productivity, and surface finish. Understanding cutting variables reduces tool wear, damage to machine components, and scrapped parts.

  • Metal Cutting High-Speed Machining 310

    • This class compares high-speed machining to traditional machining and explains the key factors that impact its successful application.

  • Metal Cutting Speed and Feed for the Mill 311

    • Speed and Feed for the Mill provides a thorough explanation of cutting variables for mill operations, including how these variables are measured, selected, and set. Many variables affect speed and feed selection, primarily the type of cutting operation, tool material, and workpiece material. This class covers speed and feed selection for both manual and CNC machines.The proper selection of speed and feed is necessary to maximize tool life, productivity, and surface finish quality. Without an understanding of cutting variables, tools will wear prematurely, machine components will sustain increased wear and tear, and the number of scrap parts produced will increase.

  • Metal Cutting Hard Turning 315

    • This class covers hard turning, including its advantages when compared to grinding and strategies for successful implementation.

  • Metal Cutting Cutting Tool Materials 321

    • Cutting Tool Materials provides an in-depth discussion of various cutting tool materials and their properties. Effective cutting tools combine a handful of valuable properties: hardness, toughness, and wear resistance. Cutting material selection is based primarily on the workpiece material, machine tool, and cutting operation, and involves an appropriate balance of properties. Available cutting tool materials have expanded and improved over the years, ranging from the very tough and inexpensive to the very hard and expensive. Other tool modifications, such as heat treatment and tool coatings, can also improve cutting tools.Selecting the proper cutting tool material is essential for a successful machining operation. The tool material dictates the material removal rate, surface finish and tolerance, and expense to the manufacturer in the form of reduced scrap, extended tool life, production rates, and part quality.

  • Metal Cutting Machining Titanium Alloys 325

    • This class identifies and addresses the challenges related to machining titanium and its alloys.

  • Metal Cutting Carbide Grade Selection 331

    • Carbide Grade Selection describes the different carbide tool grades and explains how to select the proper grade for a cutting operation. Carbide grades are classified by two systems. The ANSI C-system lists grades of C1 through C8. The ISO classification system designates carbide grades as P, M, and K, followed by a number that further describes the qualities of the carbide. Carbide grade is often dependent on the type of metal used: tungsten, titanium, or tantalum. Grades have different levels of hardness, toughness, and wear resistance. Coating carbide tools can increase wear resistance and part quality.Selecting the correct carbide grade is essential for decreasing manufacturing costs while maximizing tool life, part quality, and production rate. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the different carbide grades and select the proper grade for a particular cutting operation.

  • Metal Cutting ANSI Insert Selection 341

    • ANSI Insert Selection provides information on how to identify the qualities and properties of a carbide cutting insert based on its ANSI insert number. Carbide inserts are the most commonly used tools for metal cutting and are manufactured in a variety of types that are optimized for different applications. By learning the ANSI insert nomenclature, users can identify insert shape, clearance angle, tolerance, type, size, thickness, and cutting point among other important features. These features dictate the capabilities and ideal uses of the insert.Users who understand ANSI insert nomenclature can select and order the optimal cutting insert for any given cutting process. Proper tool selection determines part quality, production rate, and tool life and is an essential component in ensuring the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality of a manufacturing application.

  • Metal Cutting Advanced Tool Materials 345

    • Advanced Tool Materials describes advanced metal-cutting tool materials: how they are made and how they are used. Advanced tool materials include cermet, ceramic, cubic boron nitride (CBN), and diamond. Most advanced materials are harder than common tool materials, such as carbide, and they have a range of properties and applications. The primary benefits of advanced tool materials are their ability to cut hard, abrasive, and ductile materials, perform precise cuts, and cut at higher speeds.Many workpiece materials, such as superalloys and cast iron, respond best to being cut with advanced tool materials. Advanced materials can also improve the efficiency and accuracy of machining operations. An operator who understands advanced tool materials will be able to cut more kinds of materials effectively, increasing flexibility and reducing scrap and waste. After taking this course, users will know the various types of advanced tool materials as well as how and when to use them.

  • Metal Cutting Lathe Tool Geometry 351

    • Lathe Tool Geometry provides a description of single-point lathe tool angles, detailing the effect these angles have on a cutting operation. Tool angles have a significant impact on a cutting operation, as each angle offers a tradeoff between cutting-edge strength and improved tool service life, among other factors. Cutting tool angles must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, cutting application, and desired surface finish quality.Improper tool geometry leads to premature tool wear and failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. These factors increase manufacturing costs, create excess waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates. After taking this course, users will be able to better identify and implement proper tool geometry for lathe cutting processes to improve production efficiency and maximize tool service life.

  • Metal Cutting Mill Tool Geometry 361

    • Mill Tool Geometry provides an overview of the possible tool angles and insert features for a multi-point milling cutter, detailing the affect each angle has on a cutting operation. The various angles, such as the axial rake and radial rake, and their positioning offer tradeoffs between cutting edge strength and cutting forces, among other important factors. Mill tool geometry must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, and part feature.Improper tool geometry leads to premature tool wear or failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. These issues can increase manufacturing costs, create waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates. After taking this class, users will be able to identify the various angles involved in mill tool geometry and implement the proper tool geometry for mill cutting processes.

  • Metal Cutting Drill Tool Geometry 371

    • Drill Tool Geometry provides an overview of each tool angle for a drill, including point angle and helix angle, and details the impact that each angle has on a cutting operation. Changing the size of each cutting angle offers a tradeoff between cutting edge strength and cutting forces. Cutting tool angles must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, and part feature.Proper drill geometry can prolong tool life, optimize finished part quality, and greatly improve productivity. After taking this class, users will be able to identify and implement proper tool geometry for dill cutting processes. Improper drill tool geometry leads to premature tool wear and failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. Poor drill geometry can also cause deflection, which creates holes at incorrect locations and with poor tolerance. These issues increase manufacturing costs, create waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates.

  • Metal Cutting Optimizing Tool Life and Process 381

    • Optimizing Tool Life and Process provides a detailed overview of the various considerations necessary for prolonging cutting tool life. This class describes the various types of tool wear and provides explanations for how each type of wear occurs, as well as ways to reduce and prevent them. Cutting tool wear types include flank wear, crater wear, notch wear, built-up edge (BUE), plastic deformation, thermal cracking, chipping, chip hammering, and fracture.Tool cost is a significant component of overall manufacturing expenditures. Additionally, longer tool life leads to higher production rates, as it reduces the time spent indexing or changing out cutting tools. By learning to recognize, lessen, and possibly prevent tool wear, operators can prolong tool life, reduce tool cost, and improve productivity. After taking this class, users will be able to identify common types of tool wear and strategies to reduce or prevent them from occurring.

  • Metal Cutting Impact of Workpiece Materials 391

    • Impact of Workpiece Materials gives a detailed overview of the various types of workpiece materials, how they can be processed, and the challenges posed by each. Ferrous and nonferrous metals are the most common workpiece materials, and each metal has different properties and cutting tool compatibility. Non-metallic materials, such as carbides, ceramics, plastics, and composites, may require machining processes. These materials have very unique qualities, and thus have specific requirements regarding cutting tools and cutting conditions.A working knowledge of the different varieties of workpieces, their properties, and how to process them, is indispensable. In addition to understanding cutting tool properties, familiarity with the properties and demands of workpieces ensures that operators can capably run any operation. Optimizing cutting conditions leads to better products, higher output, and reduced manufacturing costs.

  • Motor Controls Relays, Contactors, and Motor Starters 201

    • Relays, Contactors, and Motor Starters provides an overview of the primary components involved in electric motor control. Relays are electrical switches that control a circuit. When activated by current, a relay opens and closes a circuit to turn a larger current on or off. Contactors control current by conducting it through metal contacts that make or break electrical circuits. When combined with an overload relay, a contactor becomes a motor starter.Working with relays, contactors, and motor starters requires technicians to understand how to properly care for such devices and how to operate them effectively. After taking this class, users will be able to describe the design and function of common relays, contactors, and motor starters, as well as the applications for each device.

  • Motor Controls Control Devices 211

    • Control Devices 211 covers the fundamental components of motor controls, devices that control the flow of current in circuits. Dangers of electric shock and other safety risks are significantly heightened when working with control devices. Control devices can be manual, mechanical, or automatic and are used in a variety of ways. Control devices include different types of buttons and switches, all of which serve differing purposes. It is necessary for those working with motor controls to understand control devices and apply their knowledge to appropriately select and operate these items according to application. After taking this course, students will be able to describe the design and function of commonly used mechanical control devices, along with applications appropriate for each device.

 

MOTOR CONTROLS

  • Motor Controls Distribution Systems 221

    • Distribution Systems 221 describes power distribution systems and their components. Distribution systems are integral parts of motor control systems because they consist of all generators, transformers, wires, and other devices used to transport power from the source to end use. Generating stations house generators that are linked together in parallel circuits to create power. Transformers step up and step down voltage. Substations house transformers and provide a safe point to cut the power.Understanding the ways in which electricity is distributed and how to work safely with distribution systems is an essential part of working within motor controls. After taking this course, users will be able to describe how power enters a facility and is distributed to electrical equipment, as well as best practices for safely working with electrical power distribution systems.

  • Motor Controls Limit Switches and Proximity Sensors 231

    • Limit Switches and Proximity Sensors introduces users to commonly used manufacturing sensors that detect the presence or absence of an object. Limit switches are mechanical sensors that require physical contact to be actuated. There are many variations of limit switches, including different operating mechanisms and environmental classifications. Proximity sensors, including inductive, capacitive, and Hall Effect sensors, do not require physical contact because they use an electronic or magnetic sensing field. These devices have different advantages and disadvantages and are used for various applications.Limit switches and proximity sensors are widely used for automated systems in all types of industries. They are used to control speed and motion as well as detect, count, position, and divert parts. After taking this class, users will understand the function, application, and installation considerations for commonly used limit switches and proximity sensors.

  • Motor Controls Introduction to Electric Motors 301

    • Introduction to Electric Motors provides a comprehensive overview of electric motors and the principles on which they operate. Electric motors use magnetic induction to turn electricity into mechanical motion. This motion is rated by mechanical power variables, such as speed, torque, and horsepower. Electric motors run on either direct or alternating current. Direct current motors include series, shunt, and compound motors. Common AC motors are squirrel cage, wound rotor, and synchronous. Different types of motors are used for different applications.All maintenance personnel must have a good understanding of electric motors because they are so commonly used. Before users can understand advanced motor control concepts, they must first develop a foundational knowledge of electric motors and how they function. This class introduces the topics that users will build on as they continue to study motor controls.

  • Motor Controls Symbols and Diagrams for Motors 311

    • Symbols and Diagrams for Motors introduces different diagrams used to represent motor circuits and symbols that circuit diagrams commonly contain. Pictorial diagrams are the simplest and use illustrated pictures to represent circuit components. Schematic diagrams and line diagrams use symbols to represent components. Wiring diagrams also use symbols, but they are more detailed than the other types of diagrams. Most motor control devices are represented on a schematic diagram.Being able to interpret motor diagrams is extremely important when working with motor controls because they show how circuits are constructed and how components are connected. Users will also rely on their knowledge of diagrams and symbols when learning about more advanced motor topics and applications.

  • Motor Controls Logic and Line Diagrams 312

    • Logic and Line Diagrams provides a comprehensive look at circuit logic and diagrams. The way a circuit functions depends on its circuit logic, which can be AND, OR, NAND, or NOR. The logic used in a circuit determines the layout of its corresponding line diagram. In general, line diagrams lay out the relationship between components on parallel lines. Line diagrams also include numbers to identify the location of components, the wires in the circuit, and the connections between components.This class will familiarize users with the rules and conventions of line diagrams, as well as the different types of circuit logic. This knowledge will allow users to read line diagrams, which is essential when working with motors and especially motor controls.

  • Motor Controls DC Motor Applications 321

    • DC Motor Applications provides a comprehensive overview of DC motors and their uses in industry. DC motors generally consist of an armature, a commutator, brushes, and field windings. DC motors may be series, shunt, or compound, depending on their field winding connections. Some DC motors use permanent magnets instead of field windings. In general, DC motors offer high torque and easy speed control, but they require more maintenance than AC motors.DC motors are used to provide control for many applications in industry, and most older manufacturing equipment uses DC motors. Since older equipment is more likely to need maintenance than newer equipment, personnel working with motor controls are more likely to need to service DC motors than AC motors. This class provides users with a good understanding of how DC motors work so that they can effectively operate and maintain these motors.

  • Motor Controls AC Motor Applications 322

    • AC Motor Applications provides a comprehensive overview of different types of AC motors and how they operate. The main components of AC motors are stators and rotors. The two basic types of AC motors are induction and synchronous motors. AC motors can operate on single-phase or three-phase power. In general, AC motors require little maintenance. Depending on its type, a motor may need to be repaired or replaced when problems occur.AC motors are the most commonly used industrial motors, and many applications that previously used DC motors are replacing them with AC motors when possible. Working with the applications that use AC motors demands an understanding of how AC motors function. After taking this class, users will have a foundational knowledge of the components, types, and uses of AC motors.

  • Motor Controls Specs for Servomotors 330

    • This class covers the basic types of servomotors and the components that can be used in a servo system.

  • Motor Controls Solenoids 331

    • Solenoids introduces different types of solenoids and their uses. Solenoids use magnetic induction to produce linear motion. Common solenoid types are direct action, plunger, bell-crank, and clapper. Solenoids are rated by their voltage and current characteristics, which helps determine the appropriate solenoid for a given application. Solenoid failure may be caused by selecting the wrong solenoid, or other common causes such as incorrect voltage or frequency.Understanding how solenoids work is necessary for working with the many applications that utilize them, including combustion engines and industrial fluid control systems. After taking this class, users will have an understanding of solenoids and should be able to identify important factors in solenoid selection and common causes of solenoid failure. Knowing how to choose the correct solenoid and avoid solenoid failure decreases the chances of solenoids burning out or needing to be replaced for other reasons.

  • Motor Controls Timers and Counters 340

    • This class describes the functions and applications of various mechanical, electromechanical, and electronic timers and counters. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Motor Controls Reversing Motor Circuits 341

    • Reversing Motor Circuits provides a comprehensive overview of the various means used to reverse electric motors. Motor control circuits use various control devices to change the direction in which a motor rotates. Reversing circuits typically use reversing starters, but they may also use drum switches, limit switches, and programmable logic controllers. To reverse a DC motor, the control device changes the direction of current flow in the motor’s armature. To reverse an AC motor, the control device interchanges two of the motor’s power lines.Many applications require motors to run in reverse, either to change the direction of operation or to brake and stop the motor. After taking this class, users will understand the basic principles behind reversing circuits for motors and be familiar with the various control devices they use. This will prepare users for designing, working with, and selecting control devices for various types of motor reversing circuits.

  • Motor Controls Motor Drive Systems and Maintenance 347

    • Motor Drive Systems and Maintenance describes the major components found in motor drive systems and best practices for system maintenance. A motor drive system typically consists of a variable frequency drive and a three-phase AC motor used to power a driven unit. The motor connects to the driven unit through a drive train. Because there are many mechanical and electrical components, motor drive systems are prone to various faults that interrupt operation and lead to downtime. Following a proactive maintenance approach can be a very effective method of preventing and dealing with system faults.Motor drive systems are used for many industrial applications. When operating motor drive systems, understanding how they work and how they can potentially fail is essential. In addition, understanding motor drive maintenance prepares users to operate machinery effectively, reducing downtime and manufacturing costs.

  • Motor Controls Electrical Maintenance for Motor Drive Systems 348

    • Electrical Maintenance for Motor Drive Systems provides a comprehensive overview of the common power quality issues that occur in motor drive systems and the methods used to inspect and resolve these issues. Electrical maintenance involves inspecting input power, DC bus output, leakage current, and insulation resistance as well as checking for overloading, single phasing, electrical unbalance, transients, harmonics, and thermal abnormalities.Many industrial applications rely on motor drive systems to power output devices. Motor drive systems consist of complex electrical components and require sufficient power quality to function correctly. Power issues in any system component can cause the entire system to malfunction and fail, leading to lost production time and increased costs. This class prepares users to effectively operate and maintain motor drive systems to minimize downtime and economic losses.

  • Motor Controls Mechanical Maintenance for Motor Drive Systems 349

    • Mechanical Maintenance for Motor Drive Systems provides an overview of the most common mechanical faults found in motor drive systems and describes typical inspection methods for mechanical maintenance. Vibration is a major issue that can have very damaging effects. Shaft misalignment, shaft imbalance, looseness, and bearing issues are the four most common causes of vibration. Vibration inspection helps identify and correct the causes of vibration. Thermal inspection, ultrasound analysis, and oil analysis are also used during mechanical maintenance.Motor drive systems are widely used to power industrial machinery. For these systems to operate safely and efficiently, their mechanical components must be in good working order. This class provides information that helps users understand major mechanical faults and how to identify and fix them. This information helps reduce unplanned downtime and expenses.

  • Motor Controls Electronic Semiconductor Devices 350

    • In this class covers the functions and characteristics of many different electronic semiconductor devices.

  • Motor Controls Photonic Semiconductor Devices 355

    • This class covers the characteristics and functions of photonic semiconductor devices.

  • Motor Controls Photoelectric and Ultrasonic Devices 365

    • This class covers the properties and functions of photoelectric and ultrasonic sensors. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Motor Controls Reduced Voltage Starting 370

    • This class describes the various methods of reduced voltage starting and explains when each type of starter is used.

  • Motor Controls Solid-State Relays and Starters 375

    • This class covers the characteristics and functions of solid state relays and motor starters. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Motor Controls Deceleration Methods 380

    • This class describes the various methods used to cause motor deceleration. It explains the situations where braking is needed and shows how braking is accomplished.

  • Motor Controls Acceleration Methods 385

    • This class will describe the factors involved with motor acceleration and how they relate to each other. It will also explain how speed and acceleration are controlled in various types of electric motors.

 

NIMS

  • NIMS NIMS Core Skills 111

    • NIMS Core Skills covers the skills necessary for all job roles within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course introduces a variety of blueprint reading and measurement topics.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Machining Level 1 standards will prepare users for certification in CNC Milling: Operations; CNC Turning: Operations; CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations; CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations; Drill Press Skills, Grinding Skills, Job Planning, Benchwork, and Layout; Manual Machining Skills; Measurement, Materials, and Safety; Turning Operations: Turning Between Centers, and Turning Operations: Chucking.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Machining Skills 121

    • NIMS Core Machining Skills covers the skills necessary for machining job roles within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course introduces a variety of safety topics, as well as deburring and refractometer readings.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Machining Level 1 standards will prepare users for certification in CNC Milling: Operations; CNC Turning: Operations; CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations; CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations; Drill Press Skills; Manual Machining Skills; Turning Operations: Turning Between Centers; and Turning Operations: Chucking.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Milling Skills 131

    • NIMS Core Milling Skills covers the skills necessary for milling-related job roles within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course introduces speed and feed and tool configuration for the mill, as well as inspection topics related to the mill.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Machining Level 1 standards will prepare users for certification in CNC Milling: Operations; CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations; and Manual Machining Skills.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Turning Skills 132

    • NIMS Core Turning Skills covers the skills necessary for turning-related job roles within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course introduces speed and feed for the lathe, as well as inspection topics related to the lathe.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Machining Level 1 standards will prepare users for certification in CNC Turning: Operations; CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations; Turning Operations: Turning Between Centers; and Turning Operations: Chucking.

  • NIMS NIMS Core CNC Milling Skills 141

    • NIMS Core CNC Milling Skills covers the skills necessary for CNC milling-related job roles within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course introduces offsets on the CNC mill, as well as homing the machine after a full shut down.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Machining Level 1 standards will prepare users for certification in CNC Milling: Operations and CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations.

  • NIMS NIMS Core CNC Turning Skills 142

    • NIMS Core CNC Turning Skills covers the skills necessary for CNC turning-related job roles within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course introduces the components and functions of the CNC lathe, as well as its offsets.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Machining Level 1 standards will prepare users for certification in CNC Turning: Operations and CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Advanced Machining Skills 151

    • NIMS Core Advanced Machining Skills 151 covers skills necessary for the CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations and CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations competencies within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers machining order of operations, manufacturer’s technical data references, setup sheets, and G code programming.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations and CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Measurement and Materials Skills 211

    • NIMS Core Measurement and Materials Skills 211 covers skills necessary for the Measurement, Materials, and Safety competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers sampling and inspection topics regarding hole tolerance, fit, and gage blocks, as well as file selection, maintenance, and use.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in Measurement, Materials, and Safety.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Job Planning Skills 221

    • NIMS Core Job Planning Skills 221 covers skills necessary for the Job Planning, Benchwork, and Layout competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers machining topics, including selecting bar stock, drilling, and filing, assembly topics, and inspection topics regarding hole tolerance, fit, and geometric tolerances.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in Job Planning, Benchwork, and Layout.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Mill Programming and Setup Skills 231

    • NIMS Core Mill Programming and Setup Skills 231 covers skills necessary for the CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers how to calculate, setup, and program a computer numerical control (CNC) machine for different operations performed on the mill.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in CNC Milling: Programming, Setup, and Operations.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Lathe Programming and Setup Skills 232

    • NIMS Core Lathe Programming and Setup Skills 231 covers skills necessary for the CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers how to calculate, setup, and program a computer numerical control (CNC) machine for different operations performed on the lathe.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in CNC Turning: Programming, Setup, and Operations.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Drill Press Skills 241

    • NIMS Core Drill Press Skills 241 covers skills necessary for the Drill Press Skills competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers order of operations, manufacturer’s technical data references, benchwork and layout operations, and drill press component configuration and inspection.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in Drill Press Skills.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Grinding Skills 251

    • NIMS Core Grinding Skills 251 covers skills necessary for the Grinding competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers grinding safety and setup topics, including grinding fluids, refractometers, wheel guarding, wheel mounting, dressing, and truing. Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in Grinding.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Manual Milling Skills 261

    • NIMS Core Manual Milling Skills 261 covers skills necessary for the Manual Milling Skills competency within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers manual mill components, setup, and cutting operations, as well as hand reaming.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in Manual Milling Skills.

  • NIMS NIMS Core Manual Turning Skills 262

    • NIMS Core Manual Turning Skills 262 covers skills necessary for the Turning Operations: Turning Between Centers and Turning Operations: Turning Chucking Skills competencies within the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard. This course covers engine lathe components, setup, and cutting operations.Taking this course in conjunction with the other listed requirements for the NIMS Level 1 Machining standard will prepare users for certification in Turning Operations: Turning Between Centers and Turning Operations: Turning Chucking Skills.

 

PLC

  • PLCs Introduction to PLCs 201

    • Introduction to PLCs provides an overview of programmable logic controllers used in manufacturing. This class introduces the components of PLCs and their functions, provides basic information on the ladder logic programming language used in PLCs, and also gives an overview of common internal relay instructions used in PLC programs.Manufacturers use PLCs to control automated processes and machines. As Industry 4.0 and smart manufacturing are gaining widespread use, PLCs are more important than ever. Having a foundational knowledge of the basic functions of a PLC helps to increase productivity and efficiency.

  • PLCs Hardware for PLCs 211

    • Hardware for PLCs provides essential information on the basic functions of a PLC's hardware components and how they work together to execute a PLC program. The hardware components of a PLC are the field devices, input module, output module, central processing unit, and the power supply. The field devices are the components that perform actions in order to control a process. PLC hardware also includes peripheral devices, such as programming devices and personal computers, which allow operators to interact with the PLC and monitor programs.After taking this class, users will be familiar with PLC hardware components, basic PLC networks, and the main steps in a PLC process. Understanding PLC hardware components and how they work together to control a machine or process is essential to working with PLCs. Many industries and automated processes rely on PLCs.

  • PLCs Basics of Ladder Logic 221

    • Basics of Ladder Logic provides an overview of the basic principles, structure, and symbols of ladder logic programming. This class introduces the components of ladder logic programming language used in PLCs and the functions, ladder diagrams, logic gates, and common input and output instructions used in PLC programs.PLC-based automation is continually growing, and ladder logic is the primary or most common language used in PLC programming. Having foundational knowledge of basic ladder logic components and functions will aid in programmer and operator efficiency and familiarity with PLC programs.

  • PLCs Numbering Systems and Codes 222

    • The class Numbering Systems and Codes explains the numbering systems used with PLCs, as well as the process for converting between different numbering systems. PLCs use numbering systems to process data and perform calculations. These systems include the decimal system, binary system, octal system, and hexadecimal system. PLC operators also use codes based on numbering systems, such as binary coded decimal, when entering information into an input/output module on a PLC.After taking this course, users will be familiar with the characteristics and conversion processes for numbering systems used with a PLC. This helps operators understand the internal operations of a PLC, which may simplify troubleshooting, reduce downtime, and improve productivity.

  • PLCs PLC Inputs and Outputs 231

    • PLC Inputs and Outputs provides an overview of the main types of input/output modules and input/output devices, their primary functions, and their roles in a PLC process. In a PLC system, the input/output modules are connected to the input/output devices that send and receive electrical signals throughout a process. Input/output modules may operate using alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC), and may be analog or discrete, depending on the type of electrical signals they process.Having a foundational knowledge of the functions and capabilities of the input/output modules in a PLC helps users understand basic PLC operation. Being aware of the different types of input/output modules and their capabilities is essential to working with PLC systems.

  • PLCs Basic Programming for PLCs 241

    • Basic Programming for PLCs provides an overview of the basic principles, structure, and instructions of PLC programming. Most PLC programs use instructions written in ladder logic, which is a graphical programming language. During programming, PLC programmers enter instructions and save them to the PLC’s CPU. Most program instructions are either input or output instructions. Other common instructions include sealing and latching, one-shot, timer, counter, and sequencer instructions. Program instructions are entered with programming devices while the PLC is in program mode.PLCs are widely used throughout industry and PLC-based automation is continually growing. PLC operators and programmers must understand how PLCs work in order to function effectively and efficiently in this growing field. After taking this class, users will have a foundational knowledge of PLC programming concepts, instructions, and functions.

  • PLCs PLC Counters and Timers 251

    • PLC Counters and Timers provides an overview of the functions of counter and timer instructions in a PLC ladder logic program. Counter and timer instructions are internal features of a program that provide increased functionality and precision for a PLC application. Counter and timer instructions are a type of output instruction that are attached to an input instruction in the program.After taking this class, users will be familiar with the different applications for counter and timer instructions and how the instructions appear in a ladder logic diagram. This class helps users to become more familiar with PLCs and PLC programming.

  • PLCs Networking for PLCs 261

    • The class Networking for PLCs offers a comprehensive overview on the types and functions of the industrial networks that connect programmable logic controllers. Connecting PLCs on a network allows multiple systems to communicate and share data, resulting in better and more efficient process control. PLCs use an industrial network with components that can withstand a harsh manufacturing environment while still offering real-time communication. Manufacturers can set up PLC networks using a variety of different configurations and hardware components. The ideal setup depends on the PLC application and communication needs.After taking this class, users will be familiar with the basics of industrial PLC networks, the required network components, and common network configurations. A knowledge of industrial networks is essential for anyone working with an automated process.

  • PLCs Hand-Held Programmers of PLCs 280

    • This class covers the basic functions and characteristics of hand-held programmers. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • PLCs PLC Diagrams and Programs 300

    • This class will teach you how to convert line diagrams and wiring diagrams for use with PLCs.

  • PLCs Overview of PLC Registers 305

    • This class introduces how digital signals are converted into binary data and how that data is stored into various types of registers.

  • PLCs PLC Program Control Instructions 310

    • This class covers some of the most common program control instructions for PLCs. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • PLCs Math for PLCs 320

    • This class covers common mathematical functions for PLCs as well as the integer and decimal values and numeric codes involved in PLC math calculations.

  • PLCs Sequencer Instructions for PLCs 330

    • This class covers sequencer instructions for PLCs.

  • PLCs PLC Installation Practices 340

    • This class covers the proper steps for planning and installing a basic PLC system. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • PLCs PID for PLCs 350

    • This class covers the effects of PID control in closed-loop systems as well as methods for tuning your controller in order to achieve the desired performance.

  • PLCs Data Manipulation 360

    • This class explains basic data moving functions and describes how and why these functions are used.

  • PLCs Shift Registers 370

    • This class explains the various register shifts than can be used in a PLC.

  • PLCs: Siemens Basics of Siemens PLCs 200

    • This class introduces the parts and operations of Siemens programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and describes the functions and different programming languages you will find on these PLCs.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens PLC Hardware 210

    • This class describes the basic hardware components of Siemens PLCs. It also covers the methods of communication between hardware components and discusses basic guidelines for PLC installation.

  • PLCs: Siemens Numbers, Codes, and Data Types for Siemens PLCs 220

    • This class reviews the basic types of numbers, codes, and data used by Siemens PLCs. Binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal numbers are covered, as well as different types of integers and scientific notation.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens PLC Communication 230

    • This class provides a comprehensive look at the techniques and devices used by Siemens PLCs to communicate with other devices.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens PLC Inputs and Outputs 240

    • This class covers the variety of PLC input/output modules and devices. In addition, the class discusses PLC device addressing and configuration, as well as PLC tag usage.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens Human Machine Interfaces 250

    • This class provides an overview of the different types of HMI devices and systems used by Siemens PLCs.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens SIMATIC Modular PLCs 260

    • This class provides a brief description of the different varieties of SIMATIC PLCs and a more in-depth overview of Modular PLCs in particular.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens PLC Programming Concepts 270

    • This class discusses the basic concepts of programming Siemens PLCs. Linear and modular programming are both discussed, as well as different types of Siemens PLC engineering software and PLC program memory usage.

  • PLCs: Siemens Basic Ladder Diagram Programming for Siemens PLCs 280

    • This class explains how basic ladder diagram programming is used to program PLCs. It examines the basic rules that are used to construct a ladder diagram program, including Boolean logic functions. It then illustrates these rules and how they relate to hard-wired circuitry by showing the various methods used to create a start-stop control application.

  • PLCs: Siemens Basic Function Block Diagram Programming for Siemens PLCs 290

    • This class explains how function block diagram programming is used to program PLCs. It examines the basic rules that are used to construct an FBD program, including Boolean logic functions. It then illustrates these rules and how they relate to hard-wired circuitry by showing the various methods used to create a forward-reverse control application.

  • PLCs: Siemens Ladder Diagram Timers and Counters for Siemens PLCs 300

    • This class explains how ladder diagram programming is used to program timers and counters. It examines the basic rules for each type of timer and counter used in LAD programming for S7-1200 PLCs.

  • PLCs: Siemens Function Block Diagram Timers and Counters for Siemens PLCs 310

    • This class explains how function block diagram programming is used to program timers and counters. It examines the basic rules for each type of timer and counter used in FBD programming for S7-1200 PLCs.

  • PLCs: Siemens Additional Ladder Diagram Instructions for Siemens PLCs 320

    • This class describes the bit logic instructions used in a ladder diagram program. Then, it more thoroughly explains compare, math, move, convert, jump, label, word logic, shift, and rotate instructions.

  • PLCs: Siemens Additional Function Block Diagram Instructions for Siemens PLCs 330

    • This class describes the bit logic instructions used in a function block diagram program. Then, it more thoroughly explains compare, math, move, convert, jump, label, word logic, shift, and rotate instructions.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens SIMATIC S7-1200 PLCs 340

    • This class describes SIMATIC S7-1200 PLCs and the various S7-1200 PLC modules that make up the PLC. This class also provides an overview of the STEP 7 Basic (TIA Portal) software used to configure and program the PLC as well as the various S7-1200 integrated technologies.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens SIMATIC S7-1500 PLCs 350

    • This class describes SIMATIC S7-1500 PLCs and the various S7-1500 modules. This class also summarizes the capabilities of the STEP 7 Professional (TIA Portal) software used to configure and program S7-1500 PLCs.

  • PLCs: Siemens Siemens Safety Integrated for Factory Automation 360

    • This class describes Siemens Safety Integrated for Factory Automation, which incorporates safety technology into standard automation, significantly reducing engineering costs, ensuring reliable and efficient operation, and enabling greater availability.

 

PRESS BRAKE

  • Press Brake Press Brake Safety 100

    • This class provides an overview of safety procedures for the press brake, including a description of how to adjust pullback cables.

  • Press Brake Press Brake Components 110

    • This class identifies the major components of the press brake and describes the most common press brake designs. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Press Brake Bending Fundamentals 120

    • This class describes key factors that affect a bending operation on the press brake and also surveys the common types of forming and bending operations. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Press Brake Die Bending Operations 130

    • This class describes the different types of bends that can be formed on the press brake.

  • Press Brake Operating the Press Brake 200

    • This class describes how to operate a press brake and also covers the different modes of operation and controls used when operating a press brake.

  • Press Brake Press Brake Specifications 220

    • This class identifies common specifications of press brakes and describes the various features and options available for common machines. Includes an Interactive Lab.

 

QUALITY

  • Quality Quality Overview 111

    • Quality Overview provides a comprehensive introduction to the importance of quality and how to achieve it in both processes and products. A quality organization meets the needs of both internal and external customers. To do this, all the departments of an organization must work together and be equally focused on quality. Organizations use various methods, such as quality management systems and quality standards to ensure quality.After completing this class, users will have a greater understanding of how each department of an organization plays a role in achieving quality as well as common approaches to improving quality. This knowledge helps emphasize the importance of quality and prepares users to learn more about specific quality management methods so that they can help contribute to quality efforts. This leads to cost reduction and improved organizational success.

  • Quality ISO 9000 Review 121

    • ISO 9000 Overview provides an introduction to the key components and requirements of ISO 9001:2008. This class discusses the standard's eight sections, along with describing the role of a Quality Management System (QMS) and ISO 9001:2008's connection to other standards in the ISO 9000 series. ISO 9000 Overview also outlines the steps to registration, the auditing process, and the importance of continuous improvement. ISO 9001:2008 is an internationally recognized standard that outlines the requirements of an effective, organized quality system. Many organizations are becoming ISO 9001:2008 certified to prove their commitment to product quality and customer service. Although streamlining documentation and implementing change can be a challenge, ISO 9001:2008 can create a more goal-oriented, connected, and efficient organization. This class helps new practitioners familiarize themselves with ISO 9001:2008's structure, content, and purpose in quality management.

  • Quality ISO 9001:2015 Review 122

    • ISO 9000 Overview provides an introduction to the key components and requirements of ISO 9001:2015. This class discusses the standard's ten sections, along with describing the role of a quality management system (QMS) and ISO 9001:2015's connection to other standards in the ISO 9000 series. ISO 9000 Overview also outlines the steps to registration, the auditing process, and the importance of improvement.ISO 9001:2015 is an internationally recognized standard that outlines the requirements of an effective, organized quality system. Many organizations are becoming ISO 9001:2015 registered to prove their commitment to product quality and customer service. Although streamlining documentation and implementing change can be a challenge, ISO 9001:2015 can create a more goal-oriented, connected, and efficient organization. This class helps new practitioners familiarize themselves with ISO 9001:2015's structure, content, and purpose in quality management.

  • Quality Approaches to Maintenance 131

    • Approaches to Maintenance provides an introduction to common manufacturing maintenance strategies, including reactive, corrective, predictive, preventive, reliability-centered, and total productive maintenance. This class describes the advantages and disadvantages of each method, the benefits of planned downtime, and the importance of a customized maintenance approach. Having a targeted, well-designed maintenance plan reduces costly machine breakdowns and production downtime. With this class, manufacturers will learn about the benefits, limitations, and goals of popular maintenance approaches, making them better equipped to support and improve their facility's method.

  • Quality Process Design and Development 133

    • This class covers the approaches to process design, particularly concurrent engineering and design for manufacturability. The class also addresses strategies for enhancing and testing manufacturability, and process analysis, modeling, and documentation.

  • Quality Product Design and Development 134

    • This class describes the elements that go into effective product design. It identifies key concepts for geometric dimensioning and tolerancing and explains the use of computer aided design.

  • Quality Production System Design and Development 136

    • This class introduces important factors involved in setting up a production system, such as location analysis, process and equipment selection, testing, and safety and quality standards. Careful planning and design leads to the production of reliable quality goods at a competitive price.

  • Quality Equipment/Tool Design and Development 137

    • This class will introduce you to basic machine design concepts, common die assemblies, and inspection devices. You will also learn about current developments in nanotechnology and nanomanufacturing.

  • Quality Intro to Supply Chain Management 140

    • This class describes the flow of products and information in a supply chain and explains the importance of customer service.

  • Quality Quality and Customer Service 175

    • This class describes manufacturers’ focus on quality and the customer. This class also identifies organizations that certify quality and describes ways quality can be quantified, controlled, and measured.

  • Quality Conducting an Internal Audit 201

    • Conducting an Internal Audit provides an introduction to the steps involved in performing an internal audit on company processes. This class describes the purpose of internal audits and the role of the audit team, along with guidelines for conducting interviews and identifying nonconformances.In order for a company to succeed, they must establish and follow practices that promote quality production. Internal auditing helps organizations review their daily activities, educate employees, and improve their quality management system. Many companies have regular internal audits in order to maintain ISO 9000 registration. Even if an organization is not seeking registration, auditing is a valuable tool for quality control and continuous improvement. Before beginning an audit, the group must understand the goals of the review and their role in the team. With this class, employees will be better prepared to conduct interviews, evaluate evidence, and contribute to corrective actions.

  • Quality TS 16949:2009 Overview 221

    • TS 16949 Overview is an introduction to the structure and requirements of the TS 16949:2009 international automotive standard. This class compares the latest edition of TS 16949 to ISO 9001:2008 and explains how the additions affect standard operating procedures in a quality management system (QMS). It includes an overview of the history and development of TS 16949 and a summary of the standard's eight sections, including a focused discussion on each Product Realization sub-clause. Many auto manufacturers and part makers become TS 16949:2009 certified to improve their business and prove the effectiveness of their QMS. TS 16949:2009 certification requires thorough documentation, product planning, and a commitment to employee training and continuous improvement. With this class, anyone in the auto manufacturing industry will better understand the contents of the standard and be prepared to navigate the document during quality initiatives.

  • Quality IATF 16949:2016 Overview 222

    • IATF 16949:2016 Overview introduces the requirements of the automotive quality management system standard. This class compares the new QMS standard to the previous QMS standard in use, ISO/TS 16949:2009. In this class, users will explore the development of IATF 16949:2016 and will gain an understanding of the requirements in the standard's 10 sections.Many automotive part makers become IATF 16949:2016 certified to improve their business, focus on quality, and meet customer-specific requirements. Companies seeking to certify their quality management system to IATF 16949:2016 must also become certified to ISO 9001:2015. IATF 16949:2016 certification requires thorough documentation, planning, a commitment to training, and continual improvement efforts. After taking this class, users will better understand the automotive QMS standard and how it contributes to the success of a company.

 

RIGGING

  • Rigging Intro to Machine Rigging 110

    • This class covers basic rigging equipment, calculating loads, inspecting equipment, and following safety precautions.

  • Rigging Rigging Equipment 120

    • This class covers the different kinds of equipment used in rigging, the properties of rope and chains, basic knots, hitches, and sling configurations, and fittings and end attachments.

  • Rigging Lifting and Moving Equipment 130

    • This class covers the different kinds of lifting devices, moving equipment, and scaffolds used in rigging.

  • Rigging Rigging Inspection and Safety 210

    • This class covers basic inspection and safety procedures for rigging equipment and lifting devices.

  • Rigging Rigging Mechanics 220

    • This class covers the mechanical laws involved in rigging, as well as essential practices for calculating the weight of a load and determining its center of gravity.

 

ROBOTICS

  • Robotics Robot Components 120

    • This class covers the functions and characteristics of the different components of an industrial robot.

  • Robotics End Effectors 125

    • This class describes the various types of end effectors and their uses. It also explains the issue of compliance and describes how to maintain end effectors.

  • Robotics Applications for Robots 130

    • This class covers the most common applications of industrial robots.

  • Robotics Automated Systems and Control 135

    • This class identifies common methods of industrial automation. It describes the available technologies and explains how they are applied in manufacturing.

  • Robotics Robot Axes 140

    • This class will describe the most common robot axes. It will explain how to understand these axes, and how they are used to control robot movement.

  • Robotics Robot Sensors 150

    • This class describes the various types of sensors that provide feedback data to robots. It also explains the categories of sensors and shows how sensors are used in industrial robotics.

  • Robotics Robot Maintenance 170

    • This class will teach you about the importance of maintenance, as well as the various approaches and methods used by maintenance workers today to keep industrial robots performing optimally.

  • Robotics Introduction to Robotics 201

    • Introduction to Robotics describes the basics of industrial robotics, including types, applications, and programming methods. Industrial robots are reprogrammable machines that can perform repetitive or dangerous tasks with a high degree of accuracy. Manufacturers increasingly use robots to perform such tasks in order to speed up production, improve part quality, and preserve operator safety. However, robots require human engineers and operators to program, maintain, repair, and oversee them.Industrial robots are highly complex machines that come in a number of types, including stationary robots and mobile robots. These robots are made of a number of intricate components that must be assembled and maintained properly. Similarly, all robots must be programmed to perform a task, and that programming can require adjusting. After taking this class, students will know the basic robot components, type, applications, and programming methods, as well as safety protocols.

  • Robotics Robot Safety 211

    • Robot Safety discusses the different ways to prevent robot accidents. Robot accidents can result in serious injuries or fatalities. Most accidents occur because employees bypass the robot's safeguards.There are two kinds of safeguarding systems that protect employees from injury when working with robots. Safety devices stop a robot from operating. Presence-sensing mats, for example, end robot operations when the pressure or weight of an employee is detected. Safety barriers prevent employees from accessing or entering dangerous robot work areas. For example, perimeter fences block employee access to areas where robots are working.Employees must receive training on the robot and wear protective clothing when near the robot. The robot must be installed and maintained as intended by the manufacturer and by authorized personnel only. All robot operators require a certain level of experience and training to work with the robot

  • Robotics Robotic Drives, Hardware, and Components 220

    • This class describes the physical components of industrial robots. It also describes how these devices move and cause motion to perform work.

  • Robotics Robot Installations 230

    • This class covers the basic steps for installing and maintaining an industrial robot.

  • Robotics Robotic Control Systems 240

    • In this class, you will learn about the basic types control systems. You will also learn about the effects of PID control in closed-loop control systems and how to tune your system in order to achieve the desired performance.

  • Robotics Vision Systems 250

    • This class describes how vision systems work and how they are used for industry. It also describes concerns with mounting cameras and lighting.

  • Robotics Industrial Network Integration 260

    • This class describes common ways networks are used for manufacturing. It also describes practical network concerns and indentifies some of the technology used to make industrial networks function correctly.

  • Robotics Robot Troubleshooting 331

    • Robot Troubleshooting describes the systematic approach of solving issues that cause robotic malfunction. Robots are complex assemblies that have many components that may require troubleshooting, including motors, end effectors, and joints. Troubleshooting focuses on identifying the root cause of a problem rather than simply addressing the symptoms, then identifying a corrective action that will resolve the root cause.Malfunctioning robots can drastically reduce the efficiency and safety of a work space. In addition to potentially creating defective parts, damaging parts, and packing parts incorrectly, malfunctioning robots may need to be removed from service to undergo repairs, which consumes time and resources. After taking this class, users will know the basic troubleshooting process, useful troubleshooting tools, and common robotic malfunction root causes and corrective actions.

  • Robotics Concepts of Robot Programming 341

    • Concepts of Robot Programming introduces the methods that engineers use to train robots to perform manufacturing tasks and the ideas behind those methods. Programming methods include online programming, where robots remain active during programming, and offline programming, where programming occurs independently of robots. Ideas behind robot programming methods include coordinate systems and control programs. Robots are increasingly used in manufacturing operations to perform tasks with great speed and accuracy. Having engineers who understand how to program robots will allow manufacturers to improve the productivity, quality, and safety of a number of different manufacturing operations, including welding, assembling, and packaging. After taking this course, users will understand the ideas behind robot programming and know the basics of the most commonly used programming methods, such as teach-pendant programming and simulations.

 

SAFETY

  • Safety Intro to OSHA 101

    • Intro to OSHA provides an introduction to the purpose of OSHA and how its standards and guidelines affect employers and employees. Most U.S. workplaces are covered by OSHA, and its existence has greatly improved workplace safety. Some industries are not covered by OSHA, however, and some states have safety programs that take the place of OSHA. OSHA standards are enforceable by law. Compliance with OSHA standards is enforced by inspections and record keeping, which have specific steps and requirements. Employers and employees have different rights and responsibilities regarding OSHA standards. Both employers and employees benefit from basic knowledge about OSHA's purpose, standards, and practices. Violations of OSHA standards are punishable by law and render the workplace unsafe for all personnel. A basic awareness of the standards, rights, and responsibilities will help employees to bolster workplace safety as well as keep the workplace legally compliant.

  • Safety Ergonomics 102

    • The class Ergonomics provides an overview of the science of ergonomics and its application in the workplace. Ergonomic hazards may be present in any work environment, and are a common safety risk. Not all ergonomic risks are apparent, but they can still cause musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Vibration, poor posture or positioning, and repetitive motion are common ergonomic hazards, though back injuries are the most common workplace injuries. The majority of work-related back injuries are caused by unsafe lifting techniques. Even computer tasks can cause MSDs over time. Ergonomic solutions should be tailored to the individual employee performing the job or task.Ergonomic programs are an effective way for any employer to increase employee safety, decrease injury and illness, reduce sick time, boost employee morale, and reduce turnover rates. Implementing proper ergonomics in the workplace increases productivity and reduces the cost of sick leave and new employee training.

  • Safety Personal Protective Equipment 111

    • The class Personal Protective Equipment introduces the purpose and uses of personal protective equipment (PPE). As defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), PPE minimizes exposure to hazards and helps prevent injury. In order to select appropriate PPE, employers must first evaluate the workplace with a hazard assessment. PPE may be categorized by the area of the body it protects. PPE is available in several types, designs, and materials. Every employer is responsible for providing the appropriate PPE for workers who require it, and it is every employee's responsibility to properly wear and use PPE. OSHA does not often specify which types of PPE should be worn, but requires that employers train each employee in proper use and retrain when PPE changes or if PPE is used improperly. After taking this class, users should be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding personal protective equipment and how they impact day-to-day operations in the workplace.

  • Safety Noise Reduction and Hearing Conservation 121

    • In the class Noise Reduction and Hearing Conservation, students will learn about the effects of sound and noise on the body and how to protect themselves from related injuries. Occupational hearing loss is preventable through hearing conservation.The two main types of hearing loss are conductive hearing loss and sensorineural hearing loss. Hearing loss may be caused by excess noise, hereditary factors, certain drugs, or illnesses. When excessive noise is present, employees must be provided with hearing protection. Using proper hearing protection will help ensure that ears remain capable of detecting important and subtle sound changes.Students enrolled in this course will learn various ways to protect their hearing and why preventative measures should be taken to avoid hearing damage. They will be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding noise levels and hearing conservation and the impact had on daily operations in the workplace.

  • Safety Respiratory Safety 131

    • Respiratory Safety details the appropriate types and use of breathing equipment for various airborne hazards. There are two common types of breathing equipment: air-purifying respirators and atmosphere-supplying respirators. Employees who require breathing equipment must undergo a medical evaluation and fit-testing. OSHA requires employers to provide employees who require breathing equipment with clean respirators in good condition, and comprehensive, understandable training. Employees must be able to demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to use respirators prior to ever wearing one.Training on the use and importance of respirators is crucial to doing safe and effective work and reduces accidents, injuries, and lost work hours. After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations and best practices for using respiratory equipment, along with environments that require this equipment.

  • Safety CDC Workplace Infection Safety and Prevention 135

    • CDC Workplace Infection Safety and Prevention provides a comprehensive overview of how workplaces should respond to diseases caused by viruses spread mainly through person-to-person contact like COVID-19. As workplaces struggle to find a new normal amid the global pandemic of 2020, finding effective ways of protecting against the spread of such viruses is imperative to ensure continued business operation without endangering employee health and safety. In this class, users will learn ways to create a healthy and safe work environment that incorporates common methods of preventing the spread of COVID-19 recommended by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and state specific guidance.

  • Safety Lockout/Tagout Procedures 141

    • Lockout/Tagout Procedures details the OSHA requirements and best practices for preventing accidental startup during maintenance and repair. It addresses electrical power and the many other forms of energy that a machine or device may use. All forms of energy must be successfully restrained or dissipated in order for safe maintenance. Lockout/Tagout Procedures describes using a lockout device that prevents unauthorized access of the energy-isolating mechanism. OSHA has strict requirements for lockout and tagout devices, which must be standardized, easily recognized warning signs. Users will learn OSHA's specific steps for all parts of the control of hazardous energy, from shutdown to startup, including defining authorized vs. affected employees.Following proper lockout/tagout procedures is essential to preventing employee injuries and fatalities. All employees must be familiar with lockout/tagout in order to prevent the dangers of accidental machine startup.

  • Safety SDS and Hazard Communication 151

    • SDS and Hazard Communication focuses on communication methods about hazardous workplace substances and how they increase employee awareness and safety. Education, labeling, data collection, testing, and other communication methods detail the dangers of specific chemicals and offer methods of protection from physical and health hazards. OSHA requires that employers establish a written hazard communication program to communicate employee responsibilities, standard implementation, chemical hazards, and safety measures. Hazard communication programs must include a chemical inventory, specific labeling, SDS for each individual chemical, and training.After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding hazardous materials and SDS and their impact on daily workplace operations. Understanding these regulations is critical in maintaining workplace safety and efficient operation.

  • Safety Bloodborne Pathogens 161

    • The class Bloodborne Pathogens explains the nature of common bloodborne pathogens and how to handle exposure in the workplace. A bloodborne pathogen is a microorganism present in human blood that can cause disease. Common pathogens include HIV, which causes AIDS, HBV, which causes hepatitis B, and HCV, which causes hepatitis C. Exposure to blood can occur in the workplace through work-related tasks and procedures, through accidents, or by administering first aid. To avoid exposure, workers should observe the universal precautions recommended by the CDC. Employers are required by OSHA to implement controls to minimize exposures in the workplace.Employees who understand how to protect themselves from bloodborne pathogen exposure make the workplace safer for everyone and benefit their employer. After taking this class, users should be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding bloodborne pathogens and how they impact day-to-day operations in the workplace.

  • Safety Walking and Working Surfaces 171

    • Walking and Working Surfaces will inform employees of the ways they can decrease the risks of injury and death regarding walking and working surfaces by following the guidelines as provided by OSHA. Hazards exist when people or objects may fall from one level to another through various openings such as floor and wall openings, floor and wall holes, platforms, or runways. All openings must be guarded by devices such as railings, covers, and toeboards. Standards regarding the construction, dimension, and usage of stairs, ladders, scaffolding, and manually propelled ladder stands are also set by OSHA. Failing to use and maintain walking and working surfaces correctly can result in serious injury. After taking this course, employees will be able to describe OSHA regulations covering safe practices with walking and working surfaces and how following those regulations will positively impact daily operations in the workplace.

  • Safety Fire Safety and Prevention 181

    • The class Fire Safety and Prevention examines common workplace fire safety procedures. Fires, no matter how small, should be reported immediately. Buildings are equipped with extinguishing systems that actuate an alarm and discharge an extinguishing agent to control advanced stage fires. Portable fire extinguishers are available for extinguishing incipient stage fires using the P.A.S.S. technique. Employees not authorized to fight the fire should evacuate immediately. Employers should create an emergency action plan that dictates the procedures to be carried out in the event of an emergency. In the event of a fire, employees should stay calm, follow procedures, and go directly to assembly areas. Employers must account for all employees and provide first aid until medical services arrive. After taking this class, users will be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding fire safety and how they impact day-to-day operations in the workplace.

  • Safety Flammable/Combustible Liquids 191

    • Flammable and Combustible Liquids describes procedures required to safely handle, store, and dispose of dangerous liquids. Flammable and combustible liquids are divided into different categories or classifications based on properties such as flash and boiling points. Anyone who must handle or transfer these liquids must take precautions such as bonding and grounding to prevent accidental ignition. OSHA requires proper hazard communication and written procedures for any process involving flammable and combustible liquids, and details various standards for methods of storage, transfer, and safe disposal.Proper handling, storing, and disposing of flammable and combustible liquids prevents costly and potentially deadly fires in the workplace. Flammable and Combustible Liquids provides users with information on liquid hazards as well as safe methods of storage, handling, transfer, use, and disposal.

  • Safety Hand and Power Tool Safety 201

    • The class Hand and Power Tool Safety provides guidelines for the safe use of common hand and power tools. Employees should never remove any safety guards from a tool’s point of operation unless authorized. Tools must be regularly cleaned and maintained, and all blades must be kept sharp. The worksite must be kept organized, clean, and dry. All tool applications require PPE, including eye and other protection. Before working, employees must consult the owner's manual and be familiar with how the tool functions. Employees must also use the right tool for the job and follow the work practices that are specific to each type of tool.When employees use proper safety guidelines when handling hand and power tools, their employers benefit from reduced accidents on the job and lowered costs caused by work-related injuries. Safe handling of tools also increases work quality. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the safe use and care of hand and power tools.

  • Safety Safety for Lifting Devices 211

    • Safety for Lifting Devices covers the different pieces of lifting equipment that may be used in the workplace and the safest ways to work with those pieces of equipment. Overhead cranes and hoists are used for lifting heavy loads. Other lifting devices include slings, portable lifting stands, gantry cranes, and derricks. Extra equipment is necessary to secure loads to lifting devices. This equipment must be inspected daily for excessive wear and damage. Understanding how to maintain and operate lifting devices will allow future operators and employers to work with lifting devices safely and effectively. After taking this class, students will be able to describe the proper steps necessary to safely lift and transport materials within the work environment.

  • Safety Powered Industrial Truck Safety 221

    • Powered Industrial Truck Safety provides an overview of safety topics related to forklifts and other PITs. OSHA has many standards surrounding the use of PITs in the workplace for operators, non-operators, attended vehicles, and unattended vehicles. OSHA also has detailed training requirements for PIT operators. To safely operate a PIT, operators must understand basic principles of stability, including the concepts of a fulcrum and centers of gravity. Operators must also be aware of the weight and shape of loads and what individual vehicles are capable of handling.Powered industrial trucks are a common source of workplace accidents, so a strong knowledge of how to safely operate and work with PITs is crucial for any environment where they are used. PIT accidents can lead to property and inventory damage as well as employee injury. Operators should know how to avoid OSHA violations and how to handle a load without tipping the vehicle.

  • Safety Confined Spaces 231

    • The class Confined Spaces explains the OSHA requirements pertaining to confined spaces. A confined space has limited means of entry or exit and is not designed for continuous occupancy. Confined space hazards are caused by the material in the confined space, the activity carried out in the space, and the external environment. OSHA requires a permit for entering any confined space with an additional hazard.Confined spaces pose a safety hazard for employees. Employers must develop a written permit-required confined space program and train and certify all permit space entrants. Training should discuss the specific types of confined spaces and hazards employees will encounter at their worksite. Entrants must wear proper PPE and use specialized equipment that does not cause additional hazards.After taking this class, the user should be able to describe OSHA regulations and best practices for performing work safely in a confined space.

  • Safety Environmental Safety Hazards 241

    • Environmental Safety Hazards details the risks of chemical, biological, physical, and ergonomic hazards in the work environment. Hazard exposure can cause injury and illness, causing short- and long-term effects. Many hazards can be detected using the senses, but special equipment is sometimes necessary. There are many forms of hazard communication, including SDS. Using PPE diminishes risks posed by exposure to environmental hazards. There are government agencies that help assure employees’ safety by creating standards and legislation and studying hazards. However, the employer is ultimately responsible for providing a safe and hazard-free environment.Awareness of environmental safety hazards can prevent employee injury, reducing time off and workplace accident rates. After taking this course, users will be able to identify various hazards in the workplace and their possible effects on the human body.

  • Safety Arc Flash Safety 251

    • Arc Flash Safety provides a comprehensive review of the ways employees can protect themselves from injuries caused by exposure to arc flash. Arc flash is an intense release of heat and light caused by a variety of workplace situations involving electricity, including equipment failure and human error. Arc flash risk assessments, boundaries, and personal protective equipment help prevent arc flash and its effects. Regular inspection and maintenance of electrical systems and machinery also help prevent arc flash.Arc flash is one of the most dangerous hazards of working with electricity. After taking this class, users will be aware of the causes and dangers associated with arc flash, as well as the precautions and personal protective equipment that can help prevent arc flash exposure. This information prepares users to work safely and effectively in environments with the potential for arc flash.

  • Safety Fall Protection 261

    • Fall Protection provides employers and employees with a comprehensive overview of fall safety for the workplace. Fall hazards exist when people or objects may slip or fall from elevated working surfaces. Employers must designate competent persons to assess fall risks on a worksite before work begins and as work is conducted. Additionally, employers must comply with fall protection standards established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), ensure employees receive adequate training to successfully adhere to fall safety practices and procedures, and provide appropriate fall protection equipment.Falls are one of the most common and preventable causes of workplace injury. Improving fall safety measures helps reduce the risk of employee injury and death. After taking this course, personnel will understand the fall safety planning process and how to apply fall safety measures that comply with OSHA standards to ensure employee safety.

  • Safety Machine Guarding 271

    • Machine Guarding provides an OSHA-based comprehensive overview of general machine safeguarding practices associated with hazardous machine components, motions, and actions. In general, machine guards and safeguarding devices are considered primary safeguards against amputation and other injuries. Yet, feeding, ejection, and location are types of secondary safeguarding methods used in combination with guards and safeguarding devices. Machine guarding is particularly important during times of inspection and maintenance. Hidden hazards from potential energy put an operator at risk even when a machine is turned off. To safeguard against this and human error, lockout/tagout procedures provide a strict set of safety guidelines for everyone to follow when performing maintenance tasks. After taking this course, users will be able to identify various machine motion hazards in the workplace and develop effective safeguarding strategies to prevent injuries.

 

SHOP ESSENTIALS

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Math Fundamentals 101

    • The class Math Fundamentals covers basic arithmetic operations, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Additionally, it introduces the concept of negative numbers and integers. The class concludes with an overview of the order of operations and grouping symbols.Basic mathematical operations are the foundations upon which all math relies. Mastery of these foundational tasks will ease a student into more complicated mathematics, such as algebra and geometry, both of which are commonly used in a variety of manufacturing environments.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Applied and Engineering Sciences 110

    • This class provides an overview of the key concepts of physics and works through practical mathematic application.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Math: Fractions and Decimals 111

    • Math: Fractions and Decimals provides the methods used to perform basic mathematical operations using fractions, decimals, and percentages. The class covers addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division with fractions and decimals. It also discusses conversions between fractions, decimals, mixed numbers, and improper fractions.Almost any manufacturing print uses fractions and decimals in its measurements. Knowing how to handle these numbers and convert between them is an essential part of the basic skills needed to work in a manufacturing environment.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Units of Measurement 112

    • The class Units of Measurement provides a thorough explanation of the English and Metric systems and how conversion between them occurs. The common base units of measurement are length, area, volume, mass, and temperature. The English system uses inches, feet, yards, and miles to measure length, while the Metric system uses the meter, millimeter, centimeter, and kilometer. Metric conversion requires simply knowing the equivalent number of units and moving the decimal point accordingly. When converting between Metric and English units, use a reference chart, multiply, or divide, depending on the conversion. Units of measurement are used every day in a production environment. Converting between units is often required, especially for businesses dealing internationally. After taking this class, users should be able to perform calculations involving common English units, metric units, and conversions between the two systems.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Manufacturing Process Applications: Part I 124

    • This class introduces common metal shaping operations, including sheet and bulk metal processes, extrusion, forging, casting, and powder metallurgy.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Manufacturing Process Applications: Part II 125

    • This class will introduce you to common finishing and coating processes, printed circuit board fabrication, and common material handling methods.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Algebra Fundamentals 141

    • Math: Algebra Fundamentals provides a detailed overview of the basics of algebra, including the operations needed to solve a single variable equation. Basic algebra is used constantly in manufacturing, from the production floor to the accounting department.Any time a number is unknown, algebra can be used to determine that missing value. Although algebra uses the same basic operations as other mathematics, there are several new operations used to find missing variables in problems. After taking this class, users will be able to simplify, factor, and balance basic equations, as well as calculate for missing values in equations with only one variable. The user will also be able to use algebra to create an equation based on a simple story problem.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Geometry: Lines and Angles 151

    • The class Geometry: Lines and Angles discusses the basic building blocks of all geometry: the line and the angle. Every print used in manufacturing is composed of lines and angles which must be interpreted to manufacture the depicted part. Though part geometry can be incredibly complex, all geometric prints can be broken down into simpler lines and angles. The relationships between the various angles formed when lines intersect can be used to solve geometry problems and interpret blueprints. An understanding of lines and angles is fundamental to learning and applying geometry as well as trigonometry and calculus. After taking this class, users should have a grasp on the types of lines and angles used in geometry, the angles that are formed by intersecting lines, and tranversals. An understanding of the basics of geometry is necessary in various fields including inspection, part program applications, and other important areas of manufacturing.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Geometry: Triangles 161

    • The class Geometry: Triangles discusses triangles and the specific mathematical operations unique to them. While the triangle is a very basic shape, it can be found as a part of more complex shapes. Triangles are often used as the basic shapes that compose three-dimensional CAD designs. Right triangles also form the basis of trigonometry. Since triangles are so commonly used, an understanding of the types of triangles and the methods for calculating missing information from them is essential to users.After taking this class, users will be able to categorize triangles by their sides and angles, calculate missing angles based on the measurements of other angles, and determine the area of a triangle.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Shop Geometry Overview 170

    • This class presents a general overview and refresher for the the most common rules of geometry.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Geometry: Circles and Polygons 171

    • Geometry: Circles and Polygons covers the specifics of geometry involving circles and polygons with any number of sides. The class includes a discussion on the internal angles of a circle as well as the method to calculate the circumference and area of a circle. Additionally, this class covers the calculation of missing angles in any polygonCircles and polygons, along with triangles, are the basic building blocks of any geometric figure. Knowledge of the calculations and uses of circles and polygons can prove useful when working with prints in any number of manufacturing capacities.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Trigonometry: The Pythagorean Theorem 201

    • Trigonometry: The Pythagorean Theorem provides an explanation of the Pythagorean theorem and how it is used to solve various math problems involving and using right triangles. The class covers the use of powers and roots and the process that is used to solve for unknown dimensions on blueprints.The Pythagorean theorem is used to solve for the lengths of sides of right triangles. To find missing measurements in a print with a right angle, manufacturers can find or create right triangles and use the Pythagorean theorem. After taking this class, users will be able to use the Pythagorean theorem to calculate missing lengths in right triangles and solve for missing dimensions on various types of blueprints by utilizing right triangles where appropriate.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Shop Trig Overview 210

    • This class presents a general overview and refresher for the rules of trigonometry.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Trigonometry: Sine, Cosine, Tangent 211

    • The class Trigonometry: Sine, Cosine, and Tangent discusses the three basic ratios that are the basis for trigonometry. Trigonometry is based on the specific relationships between the sides and angles of right triangles. Using trigonometry, a person can determine the missing angle and side measurements of a right triangle based on the information present in a drawing. Although solving trigonometric ratios often requires a calculator, users must know which ratios to apply to a particular problem and how to calculate them. In situations where parts are being manufactured, this knowledge is crucial to effective production of parts that require specific dimensions and angles.After taking this class, a user should be able to define the various trigonometric ratios, and use them to solve various problems, including calculating a taper angle on a print.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Trigonometry: Sine Bar Applications 221

    • Trigonometry: Sine Bar Applications discusses sine bars and the trigonometry required to use them. Sine bars are used when an angle needs to be machined, measured, or inspected. Sine bars are used with gage blocks to set a workpiece at an angle. To find the necessary measurements for the gage blocks or the sine bar angle, trigonometric ratios are used. These ratios include sine, cosine, and tangent. Gage pins are sometimes used with sine bars and gage blocks to increase the range of measurements.After taking this class, a user should be able to make the necessary calculations for setting up a specific workpiece angle using a sine bar.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Interpreting Blueprints 230

    • This class provides an overview of common features found in prints and describes how to properly inspect them. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Statistics 231

    • Statistics provides a good overview of the various terms and methods commonly used for statistical analysis. In modern manufacturing, statistics are used as part of continuous improvement methods to analyze the data gathered during inspections to determine the quality of a product and examine the processes used to make it.Every person in a manufacturing environment should have an awareness of what statistical terminology and be able to use statistical concepts in the workplace. After taking this class, a user will be able to calculate the mean, median, and mode for a set of data. The user will also be able to explain the difference between natural and unnatural variation, the use histograms and bell curves, and the meaning of standard deviation.

  • Shop Essentials (Applied Mathematics) Concepts of Calculus 310

    • This class covers the basic concepts of calculus.

 

SMART MANUFACTURING

  • Smart Manufacturing Cybersecurity for Manufacturing Basics 101

    • Cybersecurity for Manufacturing Basics covers the foundational concepts of cybersecurity as it relates to the manufacturing sector. As manufacturers adopt Industry 4.0 technology to enhance the digital connectivity of facilities, a fundamental understanding of cybersecurity is becoming more critical to preventing losses due to cyber attacks. The United States government identifies manufacturing as one of the 16 critical U.S. infrastructures. Consequently, ensuring the strength and integrity of this sector is crucial to national safety and security.Cyber threats generally involve attempts by hackers to utilize malware, such as viruses or digital worms, to disrupt or disable technology or to gain access to systems illegally to obtain sensitive information. Malicious hacking attempts may involve individuals, groups of individuals, or even other nations. This course will help manufacturers and manufacturing personnel understand and identify basic cyber threats.

  • Smart Manufacturing Cybersecurity for Manufacturing: Malware Overview 102

    • Cybersecurity for Manufacturing: Malware Overview covers different types of malware and how each functions. Manufacturing organizations using Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) technology and other devices with internet functionality are vulnerable to a range of existing and emerging malware threats. In addition to traditional computer worms and viruses, criminal hackers create other types of malware, such as spyware, Trojans, and ransomware, to attack digital networks. They also employ phishing and other social engineering tactics to manipulate users into performing actions that plant malware onto systems.Manufacturers should be aware of vulnerabilities associated with all their digital assets and have a basic understanding of the range of tools criminal hackers may use to compromise these assets. After taking this course, users will be able to recognize malware threats. Users will also understand the basic strategies of criminal hackers and ways to defend against them.

  • Smart Manufacturing Introduction to the Industrial Internet of Things 111

    • Introduction to the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) 111 introduces the features of the IIoT and describes its role in manufacturing. The class provides an overview of how sensors, smart devices, and the data they create can transform factory operations. It also explores how cyber-physical systems (CPS) and human-machine interfaces (HMI) are changing the way people interact with the growing network of technology in the workplace. The class also introduces digital manufacturing innovations, such as the digital thread and digital twin, and addresses concerns related to cybersecurity.It is now common for smart technology to provide detailed real-time data that creates precise instructions and feedback, enabling manufacturers to improve quality and efficiency, and to anticipate supply chain and production needs. As this technology drives Industry 4.0, an understanding of the IIoT is vital to current and future manufacturers.

  • Smart Manufacturing Data Collection Fundamentals 121

    • Data Collection Fundamentals provides an overview of the basic life cycle, structures, and qualities of common data used in Industry 4.0. Data collection describes the process of collecting and analyzing various types of electronic information. As the collection develops, analytics add value to data and provide a competitive advantage to manufacturers.After taking this class, users will be able to define what data collection is, describe how it functions and is deployed, and identify the different ways that collected data is processed and stored. Additionally, users will better understand the value and importance of the data being collected and appreciate the safety steps needed to protect it from internal and external threats.

  • Smart Manufacturing Cybersecurity for Manufacturing: Hacking Overview 201

    • Cybersecurity for Manufacturing: Hacking Overview 201 explores the various types of hackers, some common hacking methods, and strategies for defending against hacking. Hackers are generally classified based on their level of skill and their motivations for hacking. Highly skilled criminal hackers develop malware designed to harm digital systems, while less-skilled hackers may look for ways to use existing malware. Skilled ethical hackers work to correct cybersecurity vulnerabilities in digital systems to protect them from criminal hackers.Criminal hackers present a threat for manufacturers as they can attack digital systems in a variety of ways. This threat grows more complex as manufacturers adopt smart devices enabled by the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and exchange more data across digital networks. After taking this class, users will better understand the cyber threats posed by hackers as well as the tools and strategies to defend against these threats.

  • Smart Manufacturing Cybersecurity for Manufacturing: Wireless Networks 202

    • Cybersecurity for Manufacturing: Wireless Networks 202 introduces common wireless technology used in manufacturing and the risks associated with using wireless networks. Common wireless networks used in manufacturing include wireless local area networks (WLANs) and wireless personal area networks (WPANs). Using WLAN technology can expose manufacturers to security risks not associated with wired networks, such as wardriving, piggybacking, and evil twin attack. Additionally, using older WPAN technology or outdated security protocols can allow criminal hackers to easily access digital information through wireless devices.Manufacturers using wireless technology should understand the risks and employ strategies to protect their wireless networks. After taking this course, users will understand a variety of wireless networking options and their general applications, the risks associated with these networks, and effective ways to make these networks more secure.

  • Smart Manufacturing Introduction to Digital Twin 241

    • Introduction to Digital Twin 241 provides an overview of the features, benefits, and current uses of digital twins in manufacturing. Digital twins are dynamic virtual models of physical assets. Using smart sensors embedded in the physical asset, digital twins are able to provide real-time design and performance insights, helping improve operations, develop better parts and products, and test parts and machines throughout production. Artificial intelligence, machine learning, the cloud, and data sharing along the digital thread is making digital twins more powerful. As the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and smart technology drives Industry 4.0, an increasing number of manufacturing applications will use digital twins. Understanding the basics of digital twin technology will help manufacturers utilize them effectively. After taking this class, users will be able to describe what digital twins are, how they function and are used, and identify the different types.

  • Smart Manufacturing Introduction to Digital Thread 242

    • Introduction to Digital Thread 242 provides an overview of the function, software applications, and current uses of digital threads in manufacturing. Digital threads, which often work in conjunction with digital twins, represent a communication framework within a smart factory. As the digital twin develops throughout the product lifecycle, the digital thread shares data between personnel, machines, and digital storage.This class will enable users to define digital threads, describe how they function and are created, and identify the different ways they are deployed throughout the product lifecycle. Digital thread integration breaks down traditional information silos in order to send and receive critical information in real time using the same data language. Also, digital thread traceability can help manufacturers track the impact of changes and constantly improve the quality of the products.

  • Smart Manufacturing Introduction to Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence 301

    • Introduction to Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence covers advances in the field of artificial intelligence (AI) enabled by machine learning. Machine learning uses complex algorithms that enable computing devices to learn from input data and produce outputs without traditional programming. Basic types of machine learning include supervised machine learning, unsupervised machine learning, and reinforcement machine learning.Machine learning AI has a growing range of potential uses in various industries, including manufacturing. Manufacturers transitioning to Industry 4.0 should develop a basic understanding of how machine learning applications can benefit a variety of manufacturing processes. After taking this course, users will understand how data is used in algorithms that enable the three types of machine learning and gain insight into how machine learning AI capabilities may benefit their own manufacturing tasks and operations.

  • Smart Manufacturing Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence Applications 302

    • Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence Applications 302 discusses strategies for applying machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities to various manufacturing processes. ML algorithms can help improve manufacturing processes throughout a product’s lifecycle, including monitoring raw material use, optimizing production processes and supply chain logistics, and improving the product delivery and service for end users. Manufacturers can use machine learning libraries to gain valuable insights from data. Developing ML models requires the use of a programming language, such as Python, and an understanding of data analysis. Leveraging ML and AI can also vastly improve the quality of manufactured products.After taking this course, users will understand how computing devices can utilize machine learning models and how machine learning capabilities can be integrated into AI systems to automate a variety of manufacturing tasks and operations.

 

SOLDERING

  • Soldering What Is Soldering? 110

    • This class provides an overview of the basic tools and components used for soldering, briefly explores the importance of soldering to the electronics industry, and covers basic procedures for soldering preparation, safety, and cleanup.

  • Soldering Safety for Soldering 115

    • This class describes common safety hazards and precautions for soldering applications. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Soldering Soldering Equipment 130

    • This class provides an introduction to basic soldering equipment selection, including safety equipment.

  • Soldering Soldering Applications 200

    • This class describes essential skills for proper hand soldering and also explains how to inspect a finished joint and rework or repair a bad joint. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Soldering Solder and Flux Selection 210

    • This class describes various types of solder and flux and discusses how to select them for particular applications.

  • Soldering Soldering PCBs 220

    • This class covers how to create and repair printed circuit assemblies by soldering and desoldering various types of electronic components on printed circuit boards (PCBs).

  • Soldering Lead-Free Soldering 230

    • This class covers the specific characteristics, flux requirements, and thermal profile of lead-free solders, as well as the proper techniques to apply when using these new solder materials. Includes an Interactive Lab.

 

STAMPING

  • Stamping Press Basics 110

    • This class introduces common stamping presses, as well as their main components and functions.

  • Stamping Stamping Safety 115

    • This class describes general safety practices that all people in the shop must observe during a press operation. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Stamping Punch and Die Operations 120

    • This class introduces the common sheet metal operations performed with the help of dies and presses. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Stamping Die Components 130

    • This class introduces dies, their main components and function within a press.

  • Stamping Coil Handling Equipment 140

    • This class describes the equipment used in a coil-fed press line and explains general coil line arrangements.

  • Stamping Die Cutting Variables 200

    • This class describes the steps that take place during a cutting operation and shows how clearance impacts the cutting process. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Stamping Monitoring Press Operations 220

    • This class describes how to use the basic controls on a typical press and explains how a press operator monitors the press operation. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Stamping Guiding System Components 230

    • This class describes common guiding system components used in die sets, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  • Stamping Stripper System Components 235

    • The class describes the major types of strippers and springs used in die sets, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  • Stamping Coil Loading Procedures 250

    • This class explains how to properly handle and load coil onto the uncoiler, as well as describes how to thread the straightener and feed coil stock into the die area.

  • Stamping Die Setting Procedures 300

    • This class describes how to change a die and explains proper setup procedures for die setting.

 

SUPERVISOR ESSENTIALS

  • Supervisor Essentials Essentials of Leadership 110

    • This class describes the basic responsibilities of a leader and gives helpful ideas about how to gain the respect and trust of others. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Essentials of Communication 120

    • This class describes key types of communication and common roadblocks to communication, as well as how to use effective communication as a tool to help build teamwork and manage conflict. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Managing Performance: Best Practices 130

    • This class covers the various aspects of performance management as well as strategies for motivating employees. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Managing Performance: Corrective Actions 135

    • This class covers how to address employee performance issues, as well as the basic practices for employee termination. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Basics of Manufacturing Costs 140

    • This class describes the basic costs associated with manufacturing and how these costs are typically controlled.

  • Supervisor Essentials Intro to Managerial Accounting 145

    • This class explains the basics of managerial accounting and how this information helps a manager make informed decisions.

  • Supervisor Essentials Conflict Resolution Principles 150

    • This class covers the basic steps that a manager can take to resolve conflicts in the workplace and help ensure that the same conflicts do not return. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Conflict Resolution for Different Groups 155

    • This class describes a variety of situations in which a conflict may occur and offers advice for the best approaches to dealing with those conflicts. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Team Leadership 160

    • This class teaches the basics of effectively leading a team, including picking team members and resolving conflicts. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Manufacturing Management 180

    • This class is an introduction to management for CMfgT. It covers a number of management topics, including project planning, organizational design, theories of leadership and labor relations.

  • Supervisor Essentials Personal Effectiveness 190

    • This class introduces the importance of effective communication and the various forms and mediums of communication in the workplace. The need for encouraging creativity, innovation, and the importance of knowledge and learning in the 21st century workplace is also described.

  • Supervisor Essentials Managing the Diverse Workplace 210

    • This class describes the issues surrounding diversity in the modern workplace, as well as describing some employer responsibilities in regards to diversity management. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Harassment and Discrimination 215

    • This class covers how to identify and prevent harassment and discrimination in a diverse workplace, as well as some basic Federal laws that protect workers from harassment and discrimination. Includes an Interactive Lab.

  • Supervisor Essentials Performance Management and the Law 230

    • This class covers the basic Federal employment laws that apply to manufacturing. Includes an Interactive Lab.

 

WELDING

  • Welding What Is Oxyfuel Welding? 100

    • This class describes the basic concepts of oxyfuel welding, including what equipment and gases are needed to weld. Also, it describes the various other processes that an oxyfuel torch may be used for.

  • Welding Welding Safety Essentials 101

    • The class Welding Safety Essentials provides a broad overview of safety topics for various welding processes. The course describes general safety practices, such as electrical, fire, cylinder, and fume safety, that welders must follow. The class also provides an overview of guideline-setting organizations, such as OSHA and ANSI.Preventing accidents is crucial to any welder or welding organization. Safety issues endanger personnel, reduce quality and productivity, and harm the performance of any organization. After taking Welding Safety Essentials, welders will be prepared to follow welding safety guidelines and will be informed about safety standards important to the welding industry, allowing for a productive workplace.

  • Welding Oxyfuel Welding Safety 105

    • This class covers the basic safety procedures for handling oxyfuel welding equipment, including personal protective equipment, ventilation, and fire safety.

  • Welding PPE for Welding 111

    • PPE for Welding introduces the purpose and uses of personal protective equipment (PPE) for welders. Welding hazards include electric shock, fume and gas exposure, arc radiation, and fire and explosion. Welders are most likely to sustain burns to the skin or eyes. OSHA and ANSI issue standards for PPE. To prevent injury, welders should wear appropriate PPE to cover all exposed skin, including safety glasses or goggles, a welding helmet, hearing protection, welding gloves, and leather high-top shoes. Welding PPE should be fire resistant, protect the eyes from harmful light, fit comfortably, and provide adequate protection. Employers must train employees in proper PPE use and complete a hazard assessment.Proper PPE not only protects workers from injury, but helps prevent productivity loss due to sick time and ensures that workplaces are OSHA compliant. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the PPE necessary to perform welding operations safely.

  • Welding Welding Fumes and Gases Safety 121

    • The class Welding Fumes and Gases Safety helps students to understand the dangers of fume and gas generation in welding. The fume plume, a visible cloud of smoke rising from the molten metal, consists of complex metallic oxides and particles formed from the consumable and base metal. Shielding gases used in welding may also produce potentially harmful fumes. Exposure to fumes can be managed through engineering controls, ventilation, proper PPE, and adherence to exposure limits set by OSHA or other organizations. After taking this class, the student will understand the potential dangers of welding fumes and gases, as well as the acute and chronic symptoms that may develop after overexposure. This class discusses how workplace practices and engineering controls can be used to control exposure, in addition to following Permissible Exposure Limits and using air-supplied respirators when necessary.

  • Welding Electrical Safety for Welding 131

    • Electrical Safety for Welding introduces users to the electrical hazards of arc welding and methods of reducing them. Arc welding requires a live electrical circuit, which presents several potential safety hazards. Electricity can cause burns, fires, and electric shock. There are two types of electric shock: primary voltage shock and secondary voltage shock. To prevent the risks associated with electricity, welders must make sure equipment is properly installed, grounded, and maintained. Welders must also use the necessary PPE and insulation to prevent injury.After taking this class, users will have a good understanding of the major safety hazards associated with electricity and precautions that minimize these risks. This knowledge allows users to work more safely and effectively with electrical equipment, which is required for all arc welding processes.

  • Welding Introduction to Welding 141

    • Introduction to Welding provides the foundational understanding of welding and welding processes on top of which process-specific knowledge and a more comprehensive understanding of welding in general is built. The class introduces the different welding processes as well as their general attributes and applications. In addition, it reviews joint and weld types, covers measurements which pertain to welding, discusses welding procedure specifications, and, finally, gives the user information on emerging welding practices and their effect on the practice of welding and the economy.Introduction to Welding builds foundational knowledge necessary for the educational development of any welder. Moreover, it exposes the user to conceptual ideas of welding theory and less-common welding practices such as laser welding.

  • Welding Introduction to Welding Processes 151

    • Introduction to Welding Processes provides a comprehensive overview of the most commonly used welding processes, including oxyfuel welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, flux-cored arc welding, and shielded metal arc welding. In addition, it continues to develop students’ understanding of measurements in welding and covers the Welding Procedure Specification from writing through testing and finally use.This class continues to develop the general understanding of welding begun in Introduction to Welding with a more comprehensive overview of each of the most common welding processes. It covers welding variables and presents an in-depth discussion of welding discontinuities that is continued in Overview of Weld Defects.

  • Welding Intro to Submerged Arc Welding 160

    • This class describes the submerged arc welding process as well as its advantages and limitations.

  • Welding Math Fundamentals for Welding 161

    • The class Math Fundamentals for Welding covers basic arithmetic operations used in welding, such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. This class discusses the concept of rounding whole numbers and decimals before or after calculating a problem. Math Fundamentals for Welding also gives an overview of fractions, which are used in welding measurements and blueprints along with decimals. Knowledge of basic math concepts is integral to a welder’s understanding of welding measurements and joint design.

  • Welding Geometry Fundamentals for Welding 171

    • The class Geometry Fundamentals for Welding teaches students how geometry is used in welding. A fundamental understanding of geometry and geometric concepts is a necessary skill for welding. This class discusses lines and angles, which are the basic building blocks of geometry. This class teaches users how to identify the parts of a circle and how to identify different types of triangles based on their sides and angles. In addition, this class includes lessons on how to find the area of a circle or triangle. The relationship between lines and angles can be used to read and interpret welding blueprints, as well as machine settings. After this class, users will be able to understand and work with the basic building blocks of geometry. Users will also be able to calculate the area and circumference of a circle and the area of a triangle.

  • Welding Material Tests for Welding 201

    • Material Tests for Welding introduces users to the types and purposes of welding material tests. Welding materials are tested to evaluate their properties, examine for discontinuities, and ensure the project meets welding code specifications. Testing can be destructive or non-destructive. Testing can also be used to classify metals according to their carbon content.This class includes lessons on non-destructive testing methods such as visual inspection, radiographic, ultrasonic, penetrant, and magnetic particle tests. Users will also become familiar with destructive testing methods such as the macro-etch test, fillet weld break test, guided bend test, and transverse tension test. After completing this course, users will be able to identify common material tests, the practical applications of destructive and non-destructive methods, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  • Welding Welding Ferrous Metals 211

    • Welding Ferrous Metals defines ferrous metals, describes the common forms of ferrous metal, and discusses best welding practices for each. Each type of ferrous metal has different mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Though all ferrous metals contain iron, their varying compositions require a number of different welding approaches.Ferrous metals are the most common metals that welders will encounter. Knowledge of ferrous metal types, composition, and best welding practices is crucial. After taking this class, welders should be able to identify the various ferrous metals, their properties, and the best welding practices for each type.

  • Welding Welding Nonferrous Metals 212

    • Welding Nonferrous Metals defines nonferrous metals, describes a range of nonferrous metals and their properties, and discusses best welding practices for each type. The nonferrous metal label encompasses a wide range of metals with varying mechanical and physical properties, all of which require different approaches when welding.Though less common than ferrous metals, nonferrous metals are used in a wide range of applications that require welding. Understanding nonferrous metals and their welding processes is essential for any welder. After completing this class, a user will be able to identify the various nonferrous metals, explain their properties, and describe the best welding approach for each type of metal.

  • Welding Overview of Weld Types 221

    • The class Overview of Weld Types provides an overview of different joints and types of welds as well as their applications. Common weld types such as fillet and groove welds, as well as combination, plug, slot, spot, and seam welds, are discussed. In addition, the different parts of a weld and different welding positions are reviewed. Finally, the class covers the requirements of a variety of joints. A short lesson on weld discontinuities is also included in order to introduce the concept to the user.Overview of Weld Types helps to build a solid foundation for advanced welding techniques as well as more comprehensive reviews of specific welding processes. After taking the class, users should have a good general understanding of the names and functions of different joints, weld types, welding positions, and joint requirements.

  • Welding Overview of Weld Defects 222

    • Overview of Weld Defects provides a comprehensive introduction to the most common varieties of weld discontinuities and distortion. It illustrates the causes of each of the twenty different weld discontinuities and defects and suggests effective solutions. In addition, it presents an overview of six different kinds of cracks and demonstrates how to prevent cracking and distortion in a finished weld.This class is especially crucial for beginning welders who do not yet have the skills or knowledge to avoid many of the mistakes that the class illustrates. Beginning welders will find this class particularly useful because it defines the reasons why defects or discontinuities may occur as well as the ways in which welders may rectify them.

  • Welding Welding Symbols and Codes 231

    • Welding Symbols and Codes describes how welding blueprints represent welding requirements. A weld is represented in a blueprint using a welding symbol. Welding symbols, which were created by the American Welding Society, include a reference line, arrow element, weld symbol or symbols, tail, and weld dimensions. When needed, the welding symbol will also have supplementary symbols and finish symbols.The welding symbol includes various components on the reference line to show the characteristics of the weld and provide specific instructions to the welder. After taking this class, users should be able to explain the many types of welding symbols and their characteristics, as well as the welding codes and specifications used in the welding industry.

  • Welding Fabrication Process 232

    • Fabrication Process outlines the procedures that a project planner should follow when creating a product from start to finish. A fabrication project can be something as simple as building a cabinet or as complex as constructing a motorcycle. After coming up with a project idea, the planner should list all of the requirements, including material, safety, and budgetary concerns. If all requirements can be met, the planner should research objects similar to the project idea and develop a design. The planner then creates a blueprint of the project, as well as a bill of materials. After deciding on the order of operations that will result in the completed project, the planner should implement the plan step by step to complete the project.There are many important considerations involved with any fabrication process. After this class, users will be able to develop a fabrication plan and complete a project.

  • Welding Electrical Power for Arc Welding 241

    • Electrical Power for Arc Welding explains the basic principles of electricity and the effect that electricity has on arc welding processes. Electricity travels in closed circuits. A basic circuit consists of a source, path, load, and control. Current is the flow of electricity. Voltage is the force that pushes current through a circuit. Resistance opposes current flow, but also makes it possible for electricity to perform work. Electrical work is called wattage. In welding circuits, the resistance of the arc converts electricity into light and heat, which melts the base metals.After taking this class, users will have a foundational understanding of electricity, electrical variables, and how electricity is used in arc welding. This will prepare users for welding, since every welder must understand basic electrical concepts to work with the arc and the welding equipment that produces the arc.

  • Welding Introduction to GMAW 251

    • Introduction to GMAW provides a comprehensive overview of the gas metal arc welding process and its equipment. GMAW is a semi-automatic or automatic process that uses a consumable electrode and a shielding gas. GMAW equipment includes a power source, wire electrode, wire feeder, shielding gas, and welding gun. GMAW typically uses a constant voltage power source and direct current electrode positive polarity (DCEP). In GMAW, there are several modes of metal transfer: short circuit, globular, and axial spray.GMAW is one of the most popular arc welding processes. Because it is semi-automatic or automatic, it is also one of the easiest to learn. After taking this class, users will be familiar with GMAW equipment and the various modes of metal transfer. This information provides the foundation necessary to learn how to perform GMAW. A good understanding of GMAW is also helpful when learning about related types of welding such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW).

  • Welding Introduction to SMAW 252

    • Introduction to SMAW covers the basic theories and practices of shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), as well as common operational procedures. SMAW is a welding process that uses shielding to protect the weld from contamination. SMAW is one of the most common arc welding processes in the world because of its simplicity, versatility, affordability, and suitability for most applications. SMAW requires a range of specialized equipment, specific electrodes, and knowledge of a number of safety precautions.After taking Intro to SMAW, welders will know how to safely handle, prepare, and operate SMAW equipment. They will know also have a basic understanding of how to perform an SMAW weld.

  • Welding SAW Applications 255

    • This class describes SAW and how to make a submerged arc weld.

  • Welding Introduction to FCAW 261

    • Introduction to FCAW provides a comprehensive overview of the flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) process and its equipment. FCAW is a semi-automatic or automatic process that is divided into self-shielded flux-cored arc welding (FCAW-S) and gas-shielded flux-cored arc welding (FCAW-G). Both FCAW-S and FCAW-G use a consumable, tubular electrode that is filled with flux-materials. FCAW equipment includes a constant voltage power source, wire electrode, wire feeder, welding gun, and, if appropriate, a shielding gas.Understanding the basic theory and process of FCAW is essential to using it successfully. After taking this class, users will be familiar with FCAW equipment and be able to distinguish between different methods and materials. Users will also be able to identify the performance characteristics, operating requirements, and finished weld properties of FCAW electrodes. This information provides the foundation necessary to perform FCAW successfully and safely.

  • Welding Introduction to GTAW 262

    • Introduction to GTAW defines gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), describes the tools used in GTAW, and discusses the various factors that should be considered when using GTAW. GTAW, or TIG welding, is a precise welding process that uses a nonconsumable tungsten electrode and inert shielding gas. GTAW can be used on a wide variety of metals, and can be performed manually or with the use of semi-automated or totally automated systems.GTAW gives the welder increased control over the weld, which allows for the fabrication of stronger and higher quality welds. The process can be complex and requires practice to master, but the improved weld quality is vital to certain applications. By the end of this class, users will be able to define GTAW, identify the tools used in GTAW, and describe the various GTAW processes and applications.

  • Welding Electrode Selection 270

    • This class describes electrode characteristics for the four major arc welding processes and explains how to select the appropriate electrode for a specific welding application.

  • Welding Overview of Soldering 271

    • Overview of Soldering defines soldering, describes the tools used in soldering, and discusses the various soldering processes. Soldering is a low-heat joining process used in applications where the heat of welding or brazing would be too great or where precise control is required. There are a number of manual and automatic soldering processes. Soldering is particularly useful in electronics and jewelry fabrication as well as in creating air and watertight seals in plumbing and other systems.After this class, users will be able to define soldering, identify the important tools involved in soldering, list soldering safety concerns, and describe the various soldering processes. It is essential for any operator who may be required to solder materials to understand the basic soldering equipment, processes, and practices.

  • Welding Thermal Cutting Overview 281

    • Thermal Cutting Overview provides a comprehensive introduction to the four most common industrial thermal cutting processes. Oxyfuel cutting uses a fuel gas flame that is mixed with pure oxygen. Air-carbon arc cutting uses heat generated by an electrical arc. Plasma cutting ionizes a high-powered stream of gas to create a plasma arc. Laser cutting severs metal with a highly concentrated and focused laser beam.Understanding the basic theories behind the four widely used methods of thermal cutting is essential to using them successfully. After taking this class, users will be able to distinguish between different thermal cutting methods as well as identify the equipment used for each. Users will also be able to identify the performance characteristics and safety considerations for these thermal cutting processes. This information provides the necessary information to perform thermal cutting methods successfully and safely.

  • Welding Oxyfuel Cutting Applications 282

    • Oxyfuel Cutting Applications provides an overview of the oxyfuel cutting process and its safety requirements, equipment components, and operating procedures. Before performing oxyfuel cutting, it is important to correctly setup the oxyfuel outfit and perform essential safety inspections. After lighting an oxyfuel torch, an operator must control the ratio of gas to produce a neutral cutting flame. During the cutting process, an operator must control specific variables, including tip height, gas flow rate, travel speed, and torch angles. Understanding these variables along with the proper cutting procedures help produce a quality oxyfuel cut.The information in this class helps prepare users to perform oxyfuel cutting, a popular thermal cutting process with a variety of applications. After taking this class, users will be familiar with many of the considerations and variables that go into oxyfuel cutting, which is essential to safely and successfully producing quality cuts.

  • Welding Plasma Cutting 283

    • Plasma Cutting describes plasma cutting equipment and discusses the setup and operation steps for plasma cutting, gouging, and piercing. Plasma cutting is a precise and efficient cutting method that uses an ionized jet of gas to generate a high temperature cutting arc and can be done by hand or with the use of CNC machine.Plasma cutting is an increasingly affordable and popular method of metal cutting. Plasma cutting balances the lower cost of cutting methods such as oxyfuel with the higher quality of laser cutting methods. After this class, users will be able to define plasma cutting, identify the tools used in plasma cutting, and describe the various cutting applications and processes. Understanding the basic plasma cutting functions and processes is essential for users to make precise, accurate cuts safely and efficiently.

  • Welding Introduction to Automation 291

    • Introduction to Automation provides a comprehensive overview of the automation technology used in welding and thermal cutting processes. Automation is the use of either CNC machinery or robotic systems to both power and perform one or more processes. Automation offers manufacturers several benefits, such as minimizing production costs and waste, reducing a part's cycle time and a work area's footprint, and improving part quality and process reliability.Understanding basic machine components, their movement, and the way in which they are controlled is essential to performing any automated welding or thermal cutting process. After taking this class, users will be familiar with automated equipment, operation requirements, and safety measures. This information provides the foundation necessary to working with automated machinery successfully and safely.

  • Welding GMAW Applications 301

    • GMAW Applications provides a comprehensive overview of how to perform gas metal arc welding (GMAW), important variables to consider, and how to prevent common defects. Before beginning GMAW, it is important to prepare by cleaning base metals and selecting an appropriate electrode. During GMAW, the welder controls electrode orientation and travel speed. Welders must also be aware of many variables, such as amperage, voltage, and shielding gas, and their effects. Understanding these variables helps prevent weld discontinuities and defects, including porosity, undercut, incomplete penetration, and incomplete fusion.The information in this class prepares users to perform GMAW, an extremely common welding process. After taking this class, users will be familiar with many of the considerations and variables that go into GMAW. A good understanding of these concepts helps prevent welders from producing irregular or defective welds.

  • Welding Advanced GMAW Applications 302

    • Advanced GMAW Applications provides an overview of various specialized GMAW processes. When performing GMAW on stainless steel or aluminum, welders must be aware of several factors. Many advanced processes use power sources that offer different types of control, such as waveform control, adaptive control, and synergic control. Advanced GMAW processes include pulse transfer, precision pulse, Surface Tension Transfer, and AC aluminum pulse. GMAW is also well-suited to automation. Robotic GMAW is one of the most popular forms of automated welding.After taking this class, users will be prepared to learn to perform more specialized and advanced GMAW processes. These processes are becoming increasingly popular because they consistently produce quality welds without the same drawbacks as conventional methods. Understanding advanced and specialized GMAW processes is important to remaining competitive in modern welding.

  • Welding Arc Welding Aluminum Alloys 310

    • This class describes the welding characteristics of aluminum and explains how its properties affect each variable in the welding process.

  • Welding SMAW Applications 311

    • SMAW Applications details the process of preparing SMAW equipment for welding and the basic steps a welder should take to perform a successful SMAW weld. Welders must be able to identify the different types of electrodes that can be used for SMAW and select the appropriate electrode for an application. A welder must then choose a method to start the arc and run a bead, and must know how to effectively break and re-start the arc when necessary. SMAW is not a perfect process, and this class covers the different flaws that a weld may contain as a result of different operator errors or other sources.To be an experienced and skilled employee, a welder must know the basic foundational techniques of the welding process. SMAW Applications teaches welders the essential components of performing shielded metal arc welding processes, as well as how to identify and avoid common discontinuities.

  • Welding FCAW Applications 321

    • FCAW Applications provides a comprehensive overview of how to perform FCAW processes. Before beginning FCAW, it is important to prepare the joint and select the appropriate electrode. During FCAW, the welder controls the electrode's orientation and travel speed. Welders must also be aware of many FCAW-specific variables, such as amperage, voltage, and shielding gas, as well as the effects of such variables. Understanding variables helps prevent FCAW weld discontinuities and defects, such as excessive spatter, porosity, and slag inclusion.After taking this class, users will be familiar with many of the considerations and variables that go into using FCAW processes, which is essential to producing quality welds and avoiding weld discontinuities and defects. The ability to recognize and avoid common welding issues reduces scrapped parts and increases quality.

  • Welding GTAW Applications 331

    • GTAW Applications provides an overview of the practical applications of the gas tungsten arc welding process. It covers all parts of the process, including personal protective equipment, power supplies, polarity, amperage, electrodes, shielding gas, cups, starting the arc, filler metal, welding techniques, possible defects, and professional and industrial applications.GTAW Applications is essential for any welder who requires an in-depth understanding of GTAW. Its focus on application extends Intro to GTAW to the practical sphere, paving the way for hands-on learning of GTAW welding.

 

WORKHOLDING

  • Workholding Introduction to Workholding 101

    • "Introduction to Workholding" describes the purpose of workholding, basic workholding devices, and how workholding devices are used. Workholding devices are used to locate, support, and secure workpieces for a variety of manufacturing operations, including machining, welding, and assembly. Common workholding devices include chucks, collets, vises, jigs, and fixtures. These common devices are used for the majority of workholding in a wide range of applications.Workholding is one of the most important aspects of a number of manufacturing operations. Having operators who understand how to use the various workholding devices is essential for efficient, safe, and high-quality part production. Proper use of workholding improves production speed as well as part tolerance and finish. After taking this class, users will be able to explain the purpose of workholding, identify common workholding devices, and describe how to use workholding devices.

  • Workholding Supporting and Locating Principles 111

    • Supporting and Locating Principles describes important concepts related to supporting and locating a workpiece on a modular fixture. In many cases, operators require modular fixtures that can more closely match the size and shape of a unique or complex part. Supporting the part is crucial in preventing workpiece deformation, while locating the part ensures it is positioned in the correct place for more efficient and repeatable operations.An understanding of how to support and locate parts on a fixture is a key aspect of several manufacturing operations, including machining, welding, and assembly. When designed to properly support and locate, a fixture helps improve production rates and finished part quality. After taking this class, users will have an understanding of concepts, practices, and devices related to supporting and locating a workpiece on a fixture.

  • Workholding Locating Devices 121

    • Locating Devices describes the components used to position a workpiece in a workholding device. Locating is a crucial part of effective workholding. Locators come in a wide range of available types with various features. Common locators include pins, buttons, and pads. V-locators, fixture plates, locating nests, and other specialty devices are also used for locating workpieces. After taking this class, users will have a basic understanding of locating principles and be familiar with different types of locating devices and their features This knowledge prepares users to properly locate workpieces and set up workholding, which is an important part of many different manufacturing operations, such as machining, welding, and assembly. Proper workpiece location can help manufacturers improve loading and unloading times, production rates, and finished part quality.

  • Workholding Clamping Basics 131

    • "Clamping Basics" describes the fundamental principles and concepts of clamping for manufacturing operations as well as common clamps and how to use them. Machine operators use clamps to hold workpieces in place and prevent their shifting during an operation due to cutting or other forces. Common clamps include strap, swing, and toggle clamps, and manufacturers use them in an array of applications, including machining, assembly, and inspection.Clamping is used in a wide array of manufacturing operations, making an understanding of how to clamp essential for most operations. Proper clamping can improve productivity by increasing the speed of manufacturing, lower costs by reducing the need to scrap or re-work parts, and improve part quality by allowing for tighter tolerances and better surface finish. After taking this class, users will understand the basic principles and considerations of clamping and be able to identify basic clamp types and describe how to use them.

  • Workholding Chucks, Collets, and Vises 141

    • "Chucks, Collets, and Vises" discusses the basics of three of the most common workholding devices in machining. Chucks, collets, and vises are highly flexible workholding that can be used in a variety of operations and with a range of workpiece types. Chucks and collets are lathe workholding used for turning, grinding, and drilling, among other operations. Vises are mill workholding used for the entire range of milling operations and can also be used for grinding and drilling operations. Important aspects of chucks, collets, and vises include usage, types, and setup.After taking this course, users will understand how and when to use chucks, collets, and vises. Knowledge of how to use chucks, collets, and vises is essential for all machine operators. The ability to effectively use these devices increases productivity, improves part quality, and reduces waste.

  • Workholding Fixture Body Construction 200

    • This class discusses common tool body forms and the material and cost considerations associated with their construction.

  • Workholding Fixture Design Basics 201

    • Fixture Design Basics describes the components and purposes of fixtures and the fundamental concepts related to creating efficient fixtures. Fixtures are custom workholding devices used in many manufacturing operations to secure, support, and locate a workpiece. Fixtures are created through combining fixture bodies, supports, locators, and clamps. Fixture components come in a variety of options that designers choose between depending on the workpiece and operation.Fixture use often leads to finished parts with stricter tolerances and improved surface finishes. Fixtures can also increase efficiency in many aspects of an operation, such as facilitating easier loading and unloading of parts and reducing the need to rework parts. After taking this class, users will understand the fundamental concepts of fixture design, the appropriate uses of fixtures, and the benefits of using fixtures.

  • Workholding Drill Bushing Selection 230

    • This class will identify the major groups of bushings and their appropriate use.


Telephone numbers are accessible to persons who are deaf or hard of hearing through the Georgia Relay by dialing 711 or 1-800-255-0056 from a TTY/TDD.

Los números de teléfono son accesibles a las personas que son sordos o con pérdida de la audición a través de Georgia Relay marcando 711 o 1-800-255-0056 de TTY/TDD.

Locations

Waycross Camden *Opening Soon* Baxley
1701 Carswell Ave 100 Keith Dixon Way 1334 Golden Isles Pkwy, W
Waycross, Georgia 31503 Kingsland, GA 31548 Baxley, Georgia 31513
912.287.6584 877.332.8682 912.367.1700
877.332.8682    
  Camden Golden Isles
Alma Cosmetology 3700 Glynco Pkwy
101 West 17th St 8001 The Lakes Blvd Brunswick, Georgia 31525
Alma, Georgia 31510 Kingsland, Georgia 31548 912.262.4999
912.632.0951 912.510.3364  
    Jesup
  Hazlehurst 1777 West Cherry St
  677 Douglas Hwy Jesup, Georgia 31545
  Hazlehurst, Georgia 31539 912.427.5800
  912.379.0041  

 

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